Adult Coloring Books are Topping the Charts

Coloring books have always been a portal to the artistic world for children. As they grow into their developmental stages and start to build a sense of self, most young children still enjoy being spontaneous, creative and begin to conceptualize who they are in relationship to the world. Adulthood has often represented the death of spontaneity, fun and sadly, art. And it’s true!

Let’s revert to Pablo Picasso for a little more insight into this phenomena. He says, “All children are artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”

Well, kids, good news: The artistic child is making a comeback in the responsibility-filled, disillusioned, adult world.

The solution: Adult Coloring Books.

Adult coloring books have been trending the last couple years with noticeable advancement in sales and visibility. According to new data released by the U.K. Publisher’s Association, the new sensation of adult coloring books in 2015 almost single-handedly lifted print sales in the last 4 years. Print is not the only thing suffering, there has also been a steady decline of e-books. The new data follows a U.S. based Publisher’s Study released earlier this year that emphasizes the huge impact of a 60% increase in sales in 2015 over 2014.

Let’s get back to the phenomena where the roots of our Being ground into the higher vibrations of creativity. Many adults report coloring has helped ease their anxiety and difficulty concentrating. Living in a world flooded with constant stimuli, it is no wonder people have difficulty concentrating or even dedicating 10 minutes to themselves in silence, meditation or any other kind of self-care.

Art remains a portal to consciousness bigger than ourselves. Adults seem to be seeking ways to improve themselves and the coloring books have been a great start. Many of the benefits of coloring, drawing, painting, making music and writing, provide for an ability to self-soothe. It is a way of calming the nervous system, or at least changing its state to one of presence and stillness.

There is extensive research that shows the positive implications of experiential and expressive arts therapy in healing trauma and PTSD. May researchers have found that modern day psychological methods go back to simple ancient wisdom teachings such as breathing, intentionally moving air in and out of the belly, to change the experience of the body and nervous system. It is in the moment-to-moment experiences where we activate our consciousness without judgment or fear, that we can also wake up to the truth of our reality. The body always keeps the score, thus it is where we store our tension, stress, anger, fear, traumas and any other negative emotions. The mere act of bringing presence and stillness, especially through coloring, is an opportunity for a person to heal the negative impact of stressors. Small steps toward healing and change.

Give 10 minutes to yourself today. Buy an adult coloring book, like The Jeremy Fish Coloring Book, and start taking coloring, self-soothing, self-reflection, childhood impulses, more sincerely.

Adult coloring books have been trending the last couple years with noticeable advancement in sales and visibility. According to new data released by the U.K. Publisher's Association, the new sensation of adult coloring books in 2015 almost single-handedly lifted print sales in the last 4 years. Print is not the only thing suffering, there has also been a steady decline of e-books. The new data follows a U.S. based Publisher's Study released earlier this year that emphasizes the huge impact of a 60% increase in sales in 2015 over 2014. Let's get back to the phenomena where the roots of our Being ground into the higher vibrations of creativity. Many adults report coloring has helped ease their anxiety and difficulty concentrating. Living in a world flooded with constant stimuli, it is no wonder people have difficulty concentrating or even dedicating 10 minutes to themselves in silence, meditation, or any other kind of self-care. Via news.upperplayground.com

 

Perfect Grey Crewneck: Velva Sheen

VS Grey10 1 605x652 Perfect Grey Crewneck: Velva Sheen velva sheen inventory grey crewneck

If you are in the market, the Velva Sheen 10oz Grey crewneck is a must. Available at Inventory. The notes: “Velva Sheen Mfg Co. was once a producer of sweats, t-shirts, jackets and gym shorts for colleges, camps, schools and the United States Armed Forces. Established in 1932, the Cincinnati Ohio based company has since changed hands and is now produced in California, USA.”

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Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery

132 605x811 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery

FIFTY24SF Gallery is proud to present, Runaways, a group of new paintings by Los Angeles based fine artist, Sage Vaughn. This exhibition marks Vaughn’s first solo show in San Francisco and first solo show in the states in 4 years. Runaways opens November 19, 2011.

After two successful exhibitions at London’s Lazarides Gallery and The Outsiders, Vaughn returns to the United States with a body of new work. The first group of work in Runaways echoes the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote, “children are all foreigners.” The work illustrates the cast off minutia in our midst, the runaways, the street urchins, scamps, and hooligans that are often ignored. The focus is on the individuals, the small things. Vaughn uses song birds, feral parrots and escaped exotic pets on their own or, at times, with an accomplice, in an obscure dystopian setting. Here the viewer can explore sentiments of rebellion, survival, isolation and stolen sweetness the birds experience as they go about their secret lives above our heads.

The second group of paintings looks at the concept of the fleeting existence of the butterfly. A butterfly is only in this form for a comparatively short period during its life span; during which, it lives to fly, to mate, and to reproduce before it fades. constructing a single visual movement based on the compulsion of the individuals illustrates the driving force behind their transformation. in these works  assembles the inconsequential to a point where they can emphasize something more powerful and instinctual. 

Runaways will feature works in a variety of mediums, including a new series of paintings and Vaughn’s iconic envelope paintings. There will also be a large-sized hand-painted print in an edition of 24.

Sage Vaughn will also present a second exhibition at FIFTY24SF Gallery starting on December 16th, 2011, featuring special installations and conceptual works. 

Sage Vaughn was born in Jackson, Oregon. He has exhibited throughout the world, including Lazarides Gallery and The Outsiders in London, Galerie Bertrand and Gruner in Geneva, Art Agents Gallery in Hamburg, Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, and DACTYL Gallery in New York.

For more information about the work, contact gallery@fifty24sf.com

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Touch the Sky Mixed Media 9 x 13 2011 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery The Lone Coyote Mixed Media 9 x 12 Mixed Media 9 x 13 2011. Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery Spider man Mixed Media 9 x 13 2011 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery Self PortraitMixed Media 9 x 12 Mixed Media 9 x 13 2011 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery Butterfly with chainlinkMixed Media 9 x 12 Mixed Media 9 x 13 2011 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery Bad Hair Mixed Media 9 x 12 2010 Sage Vaughn @ FIFTY24SF Gallery Sage Vaughn preview FIFTY24SF Gallery

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Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch Opening this Thursday Nov. 3rd

309606 10150315061531396 23612181395 8318589 720271650 n Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch Opening this Thursday Nov. 3rd teen witch moca fifty24sf gallery ART IN THE STEETS ANDREA SONNENBERG A.K.A. TEEN WITCH

FIFTY24SF Gallery is proud to present, My So Called Life, the first solo show of San Francisco-based photographer, Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch. My So Called Life opens November 3, 2011.

My So Called Life will feature over 50 photographs from Sonnenberg’s body of work, each uniquely hand-printed at Hamburger Eyes lab in SF’s Mission District.

Significant buzz was built around Sonnenberg’s photography after exhibiting works at MOCA’s seminal Art In the Streets graffiti and street art survey, as well as works included in Barry McGee and Josh Lazcano’s “Let’s Go Bombing Tonight” show in Copenhagen, My So Called Life is an accumulation of Sonnenberg’s trademark portrait, graffiti, landscape, action, and day in the life photography. Building off the unique lineage of street photography in San Francisco, Sonnenberg’s unfiltered, raw, and often humorous work has made her an active documentarian of a new generation of SF youth culture. Her intimate portraits of her friends and of herself are often candid, revealing a truth about both the city and the personalities that exist inside. The photos present a world of unbridled optimism and a carefree rebirth of homegrown bohemian culture in the midst of a city preoccupied by technological innovation.

“San Francisco has a lot to do with how I work and what I document,” Sonnenberg says. “There is this energy here, this vibe, that is impenetrable. People born here are obsessed with being native and that sense of pride also shows in people’s actions, which I love to capture.”

Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch has shown at MOCA in Los Angeles, V1 Gallery in Copenhagen, and Ed. Varie in New York City.

Screen shot 2011 10 09 at 5.21.54 PM2 Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch Opening this Thursday Nov. 3rd teen witch moca fifty24sf gallery ART IN THE STEETS ANDREA SONNENBERG A.K.A. TEEN WITCH

Andrea Sonnenberg grew up in San Francisco surrounded by photographers, graffiti artists, and musicians. By the age of 14, she was photographing and documenting the various exploits of her friends and contemporaries. Their penchant for getting into extremely unique and often dangerous situations became the basis of her body of work. Soon, she began to print her photos by hand at San Francisco’s famed Hamburger Eyes studio. Her work was included in MOCA’s 2010 Art In the Streets retrospective, the United States’ first graffiti and street art survey. Sonnenberg lives and works in San Francisco. This is her first solo exhibit at FIFTY24SF Gallery.

Screen shot 2011 10 09 at 5.22.47 PM1 Andrea Sonnenberg aka Teen Witch Opening this Thursday Nov. 3rd teen witch moca fifty24sf gallery ART IN THE STEETS ANDREA SONNENBERG A.K.A. TEEN WITCH

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Apple passes Exxon Mobil as US’ most valuable company

apple rainbow logo Apple passes Exxon Mobil as US most valuable company valuable us company Texas microsoft irving exxon mobil Apple

How valuable is Steve Jobs? About a market capitalization of $338 billion. Apple today passed Exxon Mobil as the most valuable company in the United States shortly after 11AM PST. That seems like a significant moment in time; a technology company is more valuable than an oil company. That is also a big win for iPads, iPods, MacBooks, and whatever Apple product that continues to sell at an alarmingly high rate. Microsoft had the #1 spot for a minute in 1999, but that was at the absolute height of the Dot Com bubble. Exxon Mobil, which is based in Irving, Texas, took the top spot in 2005 and remained there until Tuesday.

From The Citrus Report

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This guy is going to fund the world’s tallest building

saudi prince 007 This guy is going to fund the worlds tallest building worlds tallest buidling saudi prince prince alwaleed bin talal billionaire

Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal is funding the world’s tallest skyscraper. More importantly, you know what is fun about being a Saudi prince/billionaire? You get absolute protection from the United States and don’t have to return the favor (see funding for 9/11 attacks). According to the Guardian, “The £736m deal for the hotel, office and residential complex reaching two-thirds of a mile into the sky makes Saudi Arabia the current frontrunner in the race between the oil-rich nations for glitzy architectural trophies. The projects are seen as status symbols to show off both economic success and cultural sophistication.” My phallus is big! No, mine is way bigger!

From The Citrus Report

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A case to tax bad food…

news graphics 2007  644703a A case to tax bad food...  united states tax subsidize bad food

We just read this brilliant article in the NY Times, by writer Mark Bittman, about America taxing bad food and subsidizing vegetables. We don’t normally do this, but we are going to post the whole article, because this is a great Sunday read…

WHAT will it take to get Americans to change our eating habits? The need is indisputable, since heart disease, diabetes and cancer are all in large part caused by the Standard American Diet. (Yes, it’s SAD.)

Though experts increasingly recommend a diet high in plants and low in animal products and processed foods, ours is quite the opposite, and there’s little disagreement that changing it could improve our health and save tens of millions of lives.

And — not inconsequential during the current struggle over deficits and spending — a sane diet could save tens if not hundreds of billions of dollars in health care costs.

Yet the food industry appears incapable of marketing healthier foods. And whether its leaders are confused or just stalling doesn’t matter, because the fixes are not really their problem. Their mission is not public health but profit, so they’ll continue to sell the health-damaging food that’s most profitable, until the market or another force skews things otherwise. That “other force” should be the federal government, fulfilling its role as an agent of the public good and establishing a bold national fix.

Rather than subsidizing the production of unhealthful foods, we should turn the tables and tax things like soda, French fries, doughnuts and hyperprocessed snacks. The resulting income should be earmarked for a program that encourages a sound diet for Americans by making healthy food more affordable and widely available.

The average American consumes 44.7 gallons of soft drinks annually. (Although that includes diet sodas, it does not include noncarbonated sweetened beverages, which add up to at least 17 gallons a person per year.) Sweetened drinks could be taxed at 2 cents per ounce, so a six-pack of Pepsi would cost $1.44 more than it does now. An equivalent tax on fries might be 50 cents per serving; a quarter extra for a doughnut. (We have experts who can figure out how “bad” a food should be to qualify, and what the rate should be; right now they’re busy calculating ethanol subsidies. Diet sodas would not be taxed.)

Simply put: taxes would reduce consumption of unhealthful foods and generate billions of dollars annually. That money could be used to subsidize the purchase of staple foods like seasonal greens, vegetables, whole grains, dried legumes and fruit.

We could sell those staples cheap — let’s say for 50 cents a pound — and almost everywhere: drugstores, street corners, convenience stores, bodegas, supermarkets, liquor stores, even schools, libraries and other community centers.

This program would, of course, upset the processed food industry. Oh well. It would also bug those who might resent paying more for soda and chips and argue that their right to eat whatever they wanted was being breached. But public health is the role of the government, and our diet is right up there with any other public responsibility you can name, from water treatment to mass transit.

Some advocates for the poor say taxes like these are unfair because low-income people pay a higher percentage of their income for food and would find it more difficult to buy soda or junk. But since poor people suffer disproportionately from the cost of high-quality, fresh foods, subsidizing those foods would be particularly beneficial to them.

Right now it’s harder for many people to buy fruit than Froot Loops; chips and Coke are a common breakfast. And since the rate of diabetes continues to soar — one-third of all Americans either have diabetes or are pre-diabetic, most with Type 2 diabetes, the kind associated with bad eating habits — and because our health care bills are on the verge of becoming truly insurmountable, this is urgent for economic sanity as well as national health.

Justifying a Tax

At least 30 cities and states have considered taxes on soda or all sugar-sweetened beverages, and they’re a logical target: of the 278 additional calories Americans on average consumed per day between 1977 and 2001, more than 40 percent came from soda, “fruit” drinks, mixes like Kool-Aid and Crystal Light, and beverages like Red Bull, Gatorade and dubious offerings like Vitamin Water, which contains half as much sugar as Coke.

Some states already have taxes on soda — mostly low, ineffective sales taxes paid at the register. The current talk is of excise taxes, levied before purchase.

“Excise taxes have the benefit of being incorporated into the shelf price, and that’s where consumers make their purchasing decisions,” says Lisa Powell, a senior research scientist at the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “And, as per-unit taxes, they avoid volume discounts and are ultimately more effective in raising prices, so they have greater impact.”

Much of the research on beverage taxes comes from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale. Its projections indicate that taxes become significant at the equivalent of about a penny an ounce, a level at which three very good things should begin to happen: the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages should decrease, as should the incidence of disease and therefore public health costs; and money could be raised for other uses.

Even in the current antitax climate, we’ll probably see new, significant soda taxes soon, somewhere; Philadelphia, New York (city and state) and San Francisco all considered them last year, and the scenario for such a tax spreading could be similar to that of legalized gambling: once the income stream becomes apparent, it will seem irresistible to cash-strapped governments.

Currently, instead of taxing sodas and other unhealthful food, we subsidize them (with, I might note, tax dollars!). Direct subsidies to farmers for crops like corn (used, for example, to make now-ubiquitous high-fructose corn syrup) and soybeans (vegetable oil) keep the prices of many unhealthful foods and beverages artificially low. There are indirect subsidies as well, because prices of junk foods don’t reflect the costs of repairing our health and the environment.

Other countries are considering or have already started programs to tax foods with negative effects on health. Denmark’s saturated-fat tax is going into effect Oct. 1, and Romania passed (and then un-passed) something similar; earlier this month, a French minister raised the idea of tripling the value added tax on soda. Meanwhile, Hungary is proposing a new tax on foods with “too much” sugar, salt or fat, while increasing taxes on liquor and soft drinks, all to pay for state-financed health care; and Brazil’s Fome Zero (Zero Hunger) program features subsidized produce markets and state-sponsored low-cost restaurants.

Putting all of those elements together could create a national program that would make progress on a half-dozen problems at once — disease, budget, health care, environment, food access and more — while paying for itself. The benefits are staggering, and though it would take a level of political will that’s rarely seen, it’s hardly a moonshot.

The need is dire: efforts to shift the national diet have failed, because education alone is no match for marketing dollars that push the very foods that are the worst for us. (The fast-food industry alone spent more than $4 billion on marketing in 2009; the Department of Agriculture’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion is asking for about a third of a percent of that in 2012: $13 million.) As a result, the percentage of obese adults has more than doubled over the last 30 years; the percentage of obese children has tripled. We eat nearly 10 percent more animal products than we did a generation or two ago, and though there may be value in eating at least some animal products, we could perhaps live with reduced consumption of triple bacon cheeseburgers.

Government and Public Health

Health-related obesity costs are projected to reach $344 billion by 2018 — with roughly 60 percent of that cost borne by the federal government. For a precedent in attacking this problem, look at the action government took in the case of tobacco.

The historic 1998 tobacco settlement, in which the states settled health-related lawsuits against tobacco companies, and the companies agreed to curtail marketing and finance antismoking efforts, was far from perfect, but consider the results. More than half of all Americans who once smoked have quit and smoking rates are about half of what they were in the 1960s.

It’s true that you don’t need to smoke and you do need to eat. But you don’t need sugary beverages (or the associated fries), which have been linked not only to Type 2 diabetes and increased obesity but also to cardiovascular diseases and decreased intake of valuable nutrients like calcium. It also appears that liquid calories provide less feeling of fullness; in other words, when you drink a soda it’s probably in addition to your other calorie intake, not instead of it.

To counter arguments about their nutritional worthlessness, expect to see “fortified” sodas — à la Red Bull, whose vitamins allegedly “support mental and physical performance” — and “improved” junk foods (Less Sugar! Higher Fiber!). Indeed, there may be reasons to make nutritionally worthless foods less so, but it’s better to decrease their consumption.

Forcing sales of junk food down through taxes isn’t ideal. First off, we’ll have to listen to nanny-state arguments, which can be countered by the acceptance of the anti-tobacco movement as well as a dozen other successful public health measures. Then there are the predictions of job loss at soda distributorships, but the same predictions were made about the tobacco industry, and those were wrong. (For that matter, the same predictions were made around the nickel deposit on bottles, which most shoppers don’t even notice.) Ultimately, however, both consumers and government will be more than reimbursed in the form of cheaper healthy staples, lowered health care costs and better health. And that’s a big deal.

The Resulting Benefits

A study by Y. Claire Wang, an assistant professor at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, predicted that a penny tax per ounce on sugar-sweetened beverages in New York State would save $3 billion in health care costs over the course of a decade, prevent something like 37,000 cases of diabetes and bring in $1 billion annually. Another study shows that a two-cent tax per ounce in Illinois would reduce obesity in youth by 18 percent, save nearly $350 million and bring in over $800 million taxes annually.

Scaled nationally, as it should be, the projected benefits are even more impressive; one study suggests that a national penny-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages would generate at least $13 billion a year in income while cutting consumption by 24 percent. And those numbers would swell dramatically if the tax were extended to more kinds of junk or doubled to two cents an ounce. (The Rudd Center has a nifty revenue calculator online that lets you play with the numbers yourself.)

A 20 percent increase in the price of sugary drinks nationally could result in about a 20 percent decrease in consumption, which in the next decade could prevent 1.5 million Americans from becoming obese and 400,000 cases of diabetes, saving about $30 billion.

It’s fun — inspiring, even — to think about implementing a program like this. First off, though the reduced costs of healthy foods obviously benefit the poor most, lower prices across the board keep things simpler and all of us, especially children whose habits are just developing, could use help in eating differently. The program would also bring much needed encouragement to farmers, including subsidies, if necessary, to grow staples instead of commodity crops.

Other ideas: We could convert refrigerated soda machines to vending machines that dispense grapes and carrots, as has already been done in Japan and Iowa. We could provide recipes, cooking lessons, even cookware for those who can’t afford it. Television public-service announcements could promote healthier eating. (Currently, 86 percent of food ads now seen by children are for foods high in sugar, fat or sodium.)

Money could be returned to communities for local spending on gyms, pools, jogging and bike trails; and for other activities at food distribution centers; for Meals on Wheels in those towns with a large elderly population, or for Head Start for those with more children; for supermarkets and farmers’ markets where needed. And more.

By profiting as a society from the foods that are making us sick and using those funds to make us healthy, the United States would gain the same kind of prestige that we did by attacking smoking. We could institute a national, comprehensive program that would make us a world leader in preventing chronic or “lifestyle” diseases, which for the first time in history kill more people than communicable ones. By doing so, we’d not only repair some of the damage we have caused by first inventing and then exporting the Standard American Diet, we’d also set a new standard for the rest of the world to follow.

From The Citrus Report

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On The Road

keroauc On The Road on the road jack kerouac

I’d been poring over maps of the United States in Paterson for months, even reading books about the pioneers and savoring names like Platte and Cimarron and so on, and on the road-map was one long red line called Route 6 that led from the tip of Cape Cod clear to Ely, Nevada, and there dipped down to Los Angeles. I’ll just stay on all the way to Ely, I said to myself and confidently started. To get to 6 I had to go up to Bear Mountain. Filled with dreams of what I’d do in Chicago, in Denver, and then finally in San Fran, I took the Seventh Avenue Subway to the end of the line at 242nd Street, and there took a trolley into Yonkers; in downtown Yonkers I transferred to an outgoing trolley and went to the city limits on the east bank of the Hudson River. If you drop a rose in the Hudson River at its mysterious source in the Adirondacks, think of all the places it journeys as it goes to sea forever — think of that wonderful Hudson Valley. I started hitching up the thing. Five scattered rides took me to the desired Bear Mountain Bridge, where Route 6 arched in from New England. It began to rain in torrents when I was let off there. It was mountainous. Route 6 came over the river, wound around a traffic circle, and disappeared into the wilderness. Not only was there no traffic but the rain come down in buckets and I had no shelter. I had to run under some pines to take cover; this did no good; I began crying and swearing and socking myself on the head for being such a damn fool. I was forty miles north of New York; all the way up I’d been worried about the fact that on this, my big opening day, I was only moving north instead of the so-longed for west. Now I was stuck on my northermost hangup. I ran a quarter-mile to an abandoned cute English-style filling station and stood under the dripping eaves. High up over my head the great hairy Bear Mountain sent down thunderclaps that put the fear of God in me. All I could see were smoky trees and dismal wilderness rising to the skies. “What the hell am I doing up here?” I cursed, I cried for Chicago. “Even now they’re all having a big time, they’re doing this, I’m not there, when will I get there!” — and so on. Finally a car stopped at the empty filling station; the man and the two women in it wanted to study a map. I stepped right up and gestured in the rain; they consulted; I looked like a maniac, of course, with my hair all wet, my shoes sopping. My shoes, damn fool that I am, were Mexican huaraches, plantlike sieves not fit for the rainly night of America and the raw road night. But the people let me in and rode me back to Newburgh, which I accepted as a better alternative than being trapped in the Bear Mountain wilderness all night. “Besides,” said the man, “there’s no traffic passes through 6. If you want to go to Chicago you’d be better going across the Holland Tunnel in New York and head for Pittsburth,” and I knew he was right. It was my dream that screwed up, the stupid hearthside idea that it would be wonderful to follow one great red line across America instead of trying various roads and routes.

In Newburgh it had stopped raining. I walked down to the river and I had to ride back to New York in a bus with a delegation of schoolteachers coming back from a weekend in the mountains — chatter chatter blah-blah, and me swearing for all the time and money I’d wasted, and telling myself, I wanted to go west and here I’d been all day and into the night going up and down, north and south, like something that can’t get started.

From The Citrus Report

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IRA WOOHOO

I live in St. Petersburg, Russia, this city inspires.

I take pix of my friends and things that are important for me. to remember, like taking reports.

I use a Canon 500d, Zenit ET, Kiev-88, Polaroid 35mm.

Sorry “trained in photography” means photo schools or something  like this? then no, but I like to visit master-classes and exhibitions.

My influances are classics of photography, the Renaissance, barokko style,

In five years I see myself living in United States and working on myself, be useful for society, enjoying life, donno..

What makes me happy: tasty food, comfortable shoes, people on bycicles too.

See more of her work here

Posted from Battle at 3 A.M.