CHILDREN FACING MODERN TECHNOLOGY BY KRISTIAN JONES

by Ariadna Zierold

kristian jones, illustration, children , technology, surreal, innocence, characters, upper playground, birmingham, uk

Check out this selection of the creations by Kristian Jones, a British illustrator featuring children facing our modern technology. Jones is a freelance illustrator / artist living in the centre of the UK just outside of sunny Birmingham, producing work for magazines, clothing ranges and working for various bands and clubnights on the Birmingham music scene crafting posters and artwork of an alternative nature. His style preys on the innocence of childhood imagination, surreal worlds and fictional creatures.

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TECHNOLOGY AND NATURE INTERTWINED BY KILIAN ENG

by Ariadna Zierold

kilian eng, scifi, technology, mechanics, machines, landscape, illustration, storytelling, science fiction, upper playground

Kilian Eng works as an illustrator and concept artist based out of his hometown of Stockholm Sweden. He graduated in 2010 from Konstfack, University of Arts Craft & Design in Stockholm with a bachelor and master in Illustration and storytelling.

kilian eng, scifi, technology, mechanics, machines, landscape, illustration, storytelling, science fiction, upper playground

The visions created by him inhabit a landscape grown of blinking lights and structures of beautiful mechanics. Eng’s drawings show the artist as architect; as the omniscient voice controlling a self-created world. He works in science-fiction, but not the modern version of it – there are no horrors, no desolate worlds. He doesn’t envision an end time apocalypse, but a future where mankind has evolved to a place where technology and nature intertwine. There is optimism and hope even in the darkest and most alien of his pieces.

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THE FUTURE IS NOW BY JOSAN GONZALEZ

by Ariadna Zierold

josan gonzalez, cyberpunk, future, robotic, android, illustration, technology, robots, the future is now, upper playground

Spain based Josan Gonzalez is an artist that has exploded onto the science fiction art scene. His work depicts a grimy cyberpunk world where everyone seems to feature some kind of robotic augmentation and the only real escape is to slip on a retro-futuristic VR headset. But it’s also light and playful in a way most dystopias aren’t.

josan gonzalez, cyberpunk, future, robotic, android, illustration, technology, robots, the future is now, upper playground

The Future is Now is a collection of art all tied together by a particular vision of near-future where technology pervades, and a cheerfully oppressive government is in control of the residents of Robo-City 16.

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DYSTOPIAN FUTURE BY SIMON STALENHAG

by Ariadna Zierold

simon stalenhag, dystopian, future, sci fi, technology, children, virtual, reality, dreams, painting, upper playground

Swedish illustrator Simon Stålenhag depicts a uncomfortable collision of present and future where people much like us seem to confront a brave new technological reality. In his digital paintings children throw spears at terrifying drones, and people wander aimlessly in their yards while fully engrossed inside virtual reality helmets strapped to their heads, and sometimes there’s even a giant alien caterpillar.

simon stalenhag, dystopian, future, sci fi, technology, children, virtual, reality, dreams, painting, upper playground

The artwork is impactful as a result of this juxtaposition between the harsh realities of life and the sci-fi technologies of our dreams.

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The Future is Now | CHEMA64

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Chema64 is an artist from Mexico City, bringing the past and the future to the only time we can experience it, NOW.

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Instead of reliving old patterns, Chema64 “recycles obsolete technology and ephemera” creating visually pleasing aesthetics in multimedia art.

chema64, multimedia, art, collage, technology, mexico city, mexico, mexican artist, musician, music, upper playground, (2)

You may recognize familiar sculptures, video viewing screens and even the Gameboy that was a 90’s one-hit wonder gaming device. But the intersection of obsolete technology and short lived wonders combined, make for the joy and “newness” that resonates with these images.

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Chema64’s funky tunes can be found here.

The Latest Digital Face Manipulation Software Will Have You Questioning All Reality

Let’s face it: we’re an empire built on illusions. Media, Social Media, Politics, take your pick. But what if you could program any video, of any person, to say and do what you wanted?  Becoming a digital puppeteer of sorts.  Right now, face-swapping on Snapchat may be cool for petty amusement, but manipulating Donald Trump’s Fox News interview to advocate building Mosques in San Diego instead of a wall, in real time, might be even cooler.

Welcome to the world of Face2Face.

Visiting Stanford scientist, Matthias Niessner built upon existing Stanford research using web cameras that capture 3D facial gestures as a means of “live facial re-enactment.” As stated in The New York Times, Dr. Niessner’s goal was to use this technique to improve modern technology by means of instantaneous language translation via Skype, and improved qualities of virtual reality and dubbing in movies.

In incredibly simplistic terms, the way Face2Face works is by training itself on a Target Actor (like Donald Trump talking) and a Source Actor (like you or me) to track both facial expressions and gestures by mapping them accordingly via a commodity webcam. Once mapped, the Source Actor can seamlessly manipulate facial re-enactment in real time of the Target Actor, and let the puppeteering begin!

 

 

GLITCHY PORTRAITS BY TOBIAS KROEGER

by Ariadna Zierold

tobias kroeger, portrait, glitch, technology, graffuturism, abstract, upper playground

German artist Tobias Kroeger (aka “Tobe”), made his career as a successful street artist, but in 2013 turned his attention towards the canvas. He created a series of glitchy portraits inspired by his roots in graffiti and a growing concern for our addiction to technology. Kroeger’s paintings are often described as “Graffuturism”: a combination of graffiti in their influence and futurism in their abstraction and dynamism.

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INSA from Outer Space: The World’s largest Animated GIF

British street artist, INSA, has recently published an animated GIF captured by a satellite 431 miles away in space.  Well known for his combination work of animating his streetart through GIFs, INSA himself states that his work is “cutting edge art for the tumblr generation.”

Finished GIF:

Satellitefinal1000-insa-space

 

Now having created the largest animated painting in existence, INSA has now become a point of reference as the king of Graffiti +GIF-ing aka “Gifiti”.  The four-frame animation that was painted over 576hours in Brazil could only be photographed by satellite, since it measured 57,515 square meters.

How the Gif was made:

INSA-Satellite-Gif-UpperPlayground-002   INSA-Satellite-Gif-UpperPlayground-001INSA-Satellite-Gif-UpperPlayground-004INSA-Satellite-Gif-UpperPlayground-003INSA-Satellite-Gif-UpperPlayground-005

Urban Beekeeping in NYC

Urban Beekeeping: NYC from Adrian Bautista on Vimeo.

We wish we could say something witty about this, but something with a title of Urban Beekeeping NYC is just fine enough. “This short documentary explores the growing urban beekeeping movement in New York City and focuses on the stories of Tim O’Neal, creator of the Borough Bees blog, and Kazumi Terada, a novice beekeeper.

Adrian Bautista, Martha Glenn, and Brooke Tascona made this documentary for the Design and Technology: Sound and Vision course at Parsons New School for Art and Design during the summer semester 2011.”

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Joyce Kozloff

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The artwork of Joyce Kozloff is a beautiful arrangement of patterns, ideas, combinations and critiques. In the early 70′s she was strongly influenced by the feminist movement and her art began to express these views. Her work placed value on media and imagery that was considered unworthy of a place in the high art world and it’s connection to femininity and non-western influences challenged the the sexist, minimalist establishment of the 1970′s.

When her work was gaining multi-national attention in the late ’70s she decided to focus her energy on public work that could reach a greater audience than the gallery or museum could offer. When she shifted back to a studio practice her work took on problems of gender, sexism, racism as well as strong critique of the United States roll as a military aggressor. For more than three decades Joyce Kozloff has made enticing, attractive, intelligent work that has continually found interesting ways to make people aware of their surroundings.

Can you tell us a little about yourself. You live and work in New York right? How did get started in art?

I come from a small town in New Jersey, went to Carnegie Mellon (then called Carnegie Institute of Technology) in Pittsburgh during the 1960s, then came to NY, worked in art galleries and the UN and attended grad school at Columbia, where I got my MFA in 1967. At that time, I was making hard edged, geometric paintings, the dominant painting style of the moment.

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You began working with patterns from many different so called “non-western” influences in the 1970s. Do you think this work was just a reaction to minimalism or were there specific motivations behind the paintings you made during this time?

My thinking was turned around by the feminist movement, which shook my life and the lives of many others in the early 1970s. I questioned everything about my education. I began to look at the traditional arts of women from many different cultures, what we in the west call the decorative or applied arts. I wanted to make work that paid homage to, and learned from those often anonymous sources.

In the time that has passed since you first began making art that questioned women’s rights and the legitimacy of certain craft and design elements, have you seen positive changes to some of these issues that your work has addressed?

Absolutely! There is much interesting art that is re-contextualizing craft now. I see it everywhere, and the dialogue around it is much more sophisticated than it used to be. It’s gratifying.

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How did the feminist movement influence your art and maybe some of your views on the world?

Dramatically. I first participated in the women’s movement in Los Angeles, 1970-71, then in New York thereafter. I still have many close friendships from those years. The energy, enthusiasm, optimism and support was invaluable. We gave one another permission to explore territory that had been previously un-mined.

I really admire the decision you made to get away from the gallery scene and move into public art. You were having some really successful shows in the late 70′s. What was it that pushed you to this change?

I wanted to expand my decorative art to a public scale. It had already moved off the canvas and onto the walls and floors. (I was making ceramic tiles and printed textiles in the late 70s.) And I was excited about reaching a broader audience than the people who visit galleries and museums. I was almost messianic about grand scale public decoration.

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What made you decide to move back into the gallery?

I never stopped showing in galleries altogether, but my focus throughout the 80s and into the nineties was on public art. My exhibitions were often related to the commissions (models, drawings, photographs, or ideas for unrealized, even visionary projects). I ultimately burned out. I created 16 ambitious public projects that I’m proud of, but toward the end, there were battles over content that were devastating to me. And I had lots of ideas for private work that I never had time to realize in those years. Each project took over my life for a year or more. I was getting older, and felt a new urgency to return to an intimate studio practice. I can imagine doing a public art piece again sometime, but that is not where my passion lies now.

Does the cartography you use in much of your recent work help to connect people with some of the problems that may seem to be half way around the world?

I truly hope so! Many artists utilize maps in their work, in all kinds of different ways. Mapping is one of the chief forms of communication in the 21st century. For me, a map is like the scaffold of a building. It is a structure into which I can infuse content. Medieval and Renaissance maps are full of stories, and they have been my models. I have become an amateur student of the history of cartography. Maps reveal the biases and attitudes of their time, if one looks closely. I want to reveal today’s political realities and conflicts through re-mapping and re-inventing the world as it is presented to us daily.

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Your work has been direct in it’s opposition to many things, including the U.S. roll in military action. How much power does an artist have in causing change to political decisions in your opinion?

Hah! Very little, I’m afraid. Whenever there is talk about art that had a powerful impact, people mention “Guernica,” which was painted in 1937. Film and digital media may be having that kind of effect today, but we do not yet have the historical distance to know. I just now came home from an exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum, “Found in Translation,” in which there were several video pieces that made one think about language, history, culture and this current moment (particularly the works of Omer Fast and Steve McQueen).

Any thoughts to share on the unrest in North Africa and the middle east right now?

I believe that each country will evolve differently. Egypt and Tunisia seem to be off to a good start, so I’m hopeful.

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Who are a few people who have inspired you in your work or in life generally?

So many things: I have a voracious appetite for the visual world. The great mosques of Isfahan. The Alhambra. The paintings of Duccio and Cimabue and the Lorenzetti and Giovanni Bellini. Mackintosh and Fortuny and Sonia Delaunay and Persian miniatures and the 20th century paintings of the Baroda school (India). And movies: I grew up on Godard, Truffaut, Varda, Antonioni, Fellini. If you asked me this question on another day, I’d come up with a different list.

What can we look forward to seeing from you in the future?

I’m thinking of doing a piece about Christianity next (I’m a secular Jew). I grew up in a Catholic town, where we were the only Jewish family. I’m always fascinated by “the other”, and where I stand in relationship to those others.

See more of Joyce Kozloff’s work at: http://www.joycekozloff.net/

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report