POLITICAL ICONOGRAPHY BY ANDREW SCHOULTZ

by Ariadna Zierold

andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund

San Francisco based Andrew Schoultz has a pictorial approach to social and political commentary. Through his paintings, drawings, murals, and installations, Schoultz uses symbols and iconography to illustrate the weightier issues of contemporary life in America. Although Schoultz exhibits in galleries and museums, he often works in large-scale installations and public murals with the intention of making his work available to the general public.

andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund

In densely layered, chaotic, narrative imagery, Schoultz explores environmental crises like oil spills and natural disasters, political issues such as war and corruption, and the economics of globalization and capitalism.

andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund andrew schoultz, mural, painting, political, social, iconography, globalization, capitalism, san francisco, upper playgrpund

APPROACHING VULNERABILITIES BY CLEMENS KRAUSS

by Ariadna Zierold

clemens krauss, sculpture, installation, body, bodies, painting, social, upper playground

Clemens Krauss tries to open spaces, which allow approaches to the vulnerabilities of the individual in social, political and cultural contexts. As an artist he sees himself in the position of active participation, while significations and conclusions may remain in the beholders’ sphere of responsibility.

clemens krauss, sculpture, installation, body, bodies, painting, social, upper playground

“Social collectives are constituted by physical human interactions; the interaction of bodies. Starting from the human body, friction(s) and predetermined breaking lines within social structures are the core interest of my current work.” Clemens Krauss

clemens krauss, sculpture, installation, body, bodies, painting, social, upper playground clemens krauss, sculpture, installation, body, bodies, painting, social, upper playground

SOCIAL JUSTICE BY MODUPEOLA FADUGBA

by Ariadna Zierold

modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground

Abuja, Nigeria based Modupeola Fadugba is a multi-media artist working in painting, drawing, and socially-engaged installation. With a background in engineering, economics, and education, she works at the nexus of science, politics, and art. Fadugba works in series addressing cultural identity, social justice, game theory, and the art world within the socio-political landscape of Nigeria and our greater global economy.

modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground modupeola fadugba, painting, abuja, nigeria, drawing, installation, culture, identity, social, justice, upper playground

THE HUMAN CONDITION BY PANG

by Ariadna Zierold

pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground

Pang lives and works in London, painting both in the studio and around the city. Most of her work can be found in London, and she has painted walls in Rome, Lisbon, Paris, Vienna, Palermo, Marrakech, Ibiza, Seville and Poznan.

pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground

Exploring themes of psychology, mass social behavior and the human condition, her work contains a grisly, humorous narrative that vividly expresses her morbidly curious nature, and the more awkward questions regarding social facade, the inner-self and humanity’s constant struggle between the two.

pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground pang, street art, mural, painting, london, social, mass behavior, human, faces, upper playground

Vahap Avsar at Charles Bank Gallery

490 1000 605x426 Vahap Avsar at Charles Bank Gallery vahpa avsar charles bank gallery

We just like this installation that Brooklyn Industries co-founder, Vahap Avsar, just opened at Charles Bank Gallery in NYC. As the gallery notes, “The sheer shock of an exploded NYPD patrol car inside the gallery space, makes the viewer stop and wonder about the events leading up to such a site. The ever present knowledge of the potential dangers in our global society is something that we have almost gotten used to, but once our everyday fears are transferred onto such a powerful signifier of authority and safety, we question the strength of the social structures we have created to protect ourselves and are reminded that while oppression exists anywhere, in all truth no one is safe.”

The show is open through june 19.

via 12ozprophet.

cop2 12ozprophet 664x443 605x403 Vahap Avsar at Charles Bank Gallery vahpa avsar charles bank gallery

http://www.charlesbankgallery.com/exhibitions/15/overview/

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Benjamin Laading

4678 605x465 Benjamin Laading Street Art Paris Norway interview Graffiti france benjamin laading

Benjamin Laading is creating interesting ways to bring a strong graffiti influence into the intimacy of a gallery space. His work reflects an strong emotional burst of energy that confronts you directly. These silhouettes of shattered glass and splatters of remnants of a scribbled history allow the viewer to have a taste of the emotion only drawn from the flare of a fat cap or the crash of a window pane.

Laading has found a way to bring parts of a noisy, busy, bustling world and successfully arrange them in the clean, quiet, serene environment of the gallery. Benjamin Laading is part of a new generation of artists that are finding ways to “inject” the outside into their fine art while maintaining a clear distinction between what is made to be indoors and what is not. —Ronnie Wrest/The Citrus Report

Where are you from? Where is home?

I’m a Norwegian living in Paris. I was born in Norway, but I grew up in Africa and then France until the age of fourteen. School-time made me early discover I was dyslexic, but this handicap unconsciously made me concentrate myself thoroughly on image. In fact, the alphabet represents for me totally abstract forms.

When I was in France, from the age of seven, I had the chance to go in a Steiner school, which one of their pedagogy is to educate from the personality of the children and not to format. This helped me to have confidence in my ability to communicate plastically. Then, at the age of fourteen, when I went back to Norway, I began to make important artistic choices. I spent my youth in Norway, than came back to France, at 21, to study fine art at La Villa Arson, the Beaux-arts de Nice.

a 605x324 Benjamin Laading Street Art Paris Norway interview Graffiti france benjamin laading

Your work is obviously influenced by graffiti. Did you start out doing illegal work?

Haha ! That is an interesting actual question. There is so many writers who use their street credibility to have a name in the gallery. It’s essential for me to distinct these 2 very different places, street and gallery. It’s important that the streets and its expressions stay free. If you choose to express yourself illegally in the streets you do it for free, it is a gift, a finality in itself.

That is one of the main reason I am using my real name and not a pen-name, concerning my academic works. And above all, I consider myself as a fine art artist. Therefore, I choose not to communicate or use any forms I could have done outside the gallery walls. That is also why I have collaborated with many writers, not in order to imitate, but to treat the real thing, so there really is a shifting from the exterior to the interior, as an ‘injection’. This shifting implies an interpretation, through a process, the result of my own questions on street expressions, as a contemporary artist, treating illegal expression from an academic point of view.

b4 605x453 Benjamin Laading Street Art Paris Norway interview Graffiti france benjamin laading

You describe your work as a kind bridge between separate portions of the art world. What do you think it is that has academia and a “more established economic frame” so interested in this form?

I think it intrigues them because it is their contrary, it is the classical vice to want what you can’t have. As much as the lower class dream about establishment, knowledge end wealth, the higher class dream about getting loose, instincts and something to rebel against. It’s kind of a romantic melancholy of the social status.

laading1 Benjamin Laading Street Art Paris Norway interview Graffiti france benjamin laading

Does this mean you feel all of the popularity and commercialization is positive for the movement?

Yes, and no, it is a good thing that people are getting interested in this type of expression but at the same time it has a tendency to increases the misunderstandings. It is not because there’s colourful typography with aerodynamics on a wall that it’s graffiti. What’s bad with this misunderstanding is that it gives people the false idea that it’s interesting and acceptable if it’s done with permission, but this idea make it becomes something else that misses the real meanings : danger, action, instinct, repetition, rebellion, life in a system, existence…

The first piece I saw of yours was the work you did with Babou. Do you like working with other artists?

As I said, I take forms and ideas from this lawless streets expressions and inject them into the system of the gallery. In order to do that, I need to use some authentic forms, (I mean authentic by being meaningful in the streets). I try to put forward certain specific elements in the most simple, understandable way. In this case, vandal FAT cap calligraphy.

bl5 605x311 Benjamin Laading Street Art Paris Norway interview Graffiti france benjamin laading

What are you working on lately?

Nowadays, I am working on a project for an event on urban ecology that takes place in Nanterre, France. I am engraving on a perfect industrial plastic plate, the portrait of a polar bear roaring, enhanced by pollution dust found in freeway tunnels.

What is one artist or musician that has inspired you recently.

I would like to answer this question with an artist’s list that I consider cannot be ignored!

lesfreresripoulain.eu/
beyond-streetart.de/en/kuenstler/nug.html
gzzglz.com/
easteric.net/
members.chello.nl/j.jongeleen/page005.html
olivierkostathefaine.com/
hnteuropa.fr.st/
ivanargote.com/
dtagno.de/node/161
spy.org.es/

Any shows or projects coming up to talk about?

First of all, I’m preparing my solo exhibition on the 10th of may, in Saint-Germain-en-Laye. Than, I will participate at Perfusion 2011, an experimental reinvestment of public place, an event taking place in Strasbourg from the 19th to the 25th of September 2011. And coming up soon, a project with Skalitzers gallery in Berlin…

http://benjamin.laading.net/

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook gets his commissioned David Choe painting

Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook just commissioned David Choe for a new painting, and David finished the piece and gave it to Mr. Facebook recently. We are not sure if you remember or not, but David Choe was commissioned by Zuckerberg and Facebook to paint the walls of the Palo Alto offices of the social networking company.

And if you saw the film, “The Social Network,” you saw some of the Choe pieces he did the offices.

As Upper Playground put it, “Real Digital G’s know what’s up. Paintings are the new Bentleys.” Zuckerberg knows what’s up.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Mark Zuckerberg on “Saturday Night Live”

Posted from The Citrus Report

So, this past Saturday, you had Jesse Eisenberg, who played Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network, hosting “SNL,” then you had Andy Samberg playing his Zuckerberg character on the show, and then you had Zuckerberg himself on the show. Busy, busy night for everything Mark Zuckerberg . . . .

Posted By The Citrus Report