BREAKING THE MONOTONY BY MARTIN GORDOPELOTA

by Ariadna Zierold

martin gordopelota, painting, paintings, argentina, buenos aires, mural, murals, football, soccer, tradition, traditions, humor, upper playground

Martin Gordopelota currently lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Gordopelota breaks the monotony by shifting our gaze to the brilliant idiosyncrasies of his neighborhood futbol. On canvases and walls all over Buenos Aires, he glorifies the longstanding traditions around local five-a-side: copious beers, halftime cigarettes, post-match asado, and occasional showcases of actual skill. Gordopelota is a talent with the ability to depict the trials and tribulations that the game brings. From those boozy kick-abouts to the joys of shirted fandom. His cartoon style personifies a beautiful spirt of the game with the finer detail being looked after at every crossing. You’ll spot bucket hats, pub snacks and kits from all over re-imagined in painted form. Trefoils too, there’s a fitting nod to those brands that swoosh, stripe and serenade our kit thread, loving souls.

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Sobering murals in Brazil in protest of World Cup 2014

Today marks the first game of the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil, where host country Brazil goes head to head with Croatia. The wild anticipation and celebratory mood of all the fans roaring in the stadium and television screens helps us forget for a minute about the context of where it all takes place. While crowds of tourists pour into Brazil, the local street artist of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro went to work determined to speak up for the forgotten and downtrodden in their cities. Over 10,000 people have been forced to leave their homes for stadium construction and thousands are still homeless as a result and these walls reminds us of the raw power of political messaging through art and how small gestures can incite deep struggles hidden from view:

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Above mural painted by Brazilian artist Paulo Ito last month. The artist was quoted in the Guardian: “It’s a good way to expose the country’s problems. If the government doesn’t want to expose these things it’s because they feel ashamed. If they feel ashamed by this they might take it more seriously – at least, that’s our intention.”

Look out for OSGEMEOS in the Sky

Just in time for the World Cup that’s set to take place in Brazil this year, Brazilian artists and identical twins Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, aka ”Os Gemeos,” painted a giant mural on the body of the Brazilian Soccer Team’s Boeing 737.  The impressive scale and size of OSGEMEO’s work on a moving plane will be a sight for all to see.

“Besides the enormous challenge, for we painted in a totally unconventional medium, the concept of this work is to give unrestricted access to our art. We depicted the Brazilian population with all its varied and colorful ethnicity, bringing this work to the skies and airports in Brazil for the period of two years.” – OSGEMEOS

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The Citrus Report’s World Cup correspondent on the current Group C situation

Posted from The Citrus Report

Citrus Report World Cup correspondent, Jonathan Liu, on what the hell is going on in Group C:

With all the ties, surprise losses, and flat out craziness so far with the World Cup, we’re going to make it easy for you to figure out if the U.S. can move on because right now, they’re two teams with ties in their group, and one of them is moving on.

If Slovenia loses to England and the U.S. beats Algeria, they’re out. Simple as that. However, with England’s weak play as of late, it’s not out of the question for that to happen.  This is the toughest group to read because England and the U.S. both tied their first matches, making it a really complicated group. If Slovenia ties with England, they’re in on goal difference. No one would’ve thought it, but the Slovenia vs. England match will determine who moves on and who goes home. From group C

The United States task is simple – beat a far less talented Algerian team, and they’re in, regardless of what happens between Slovenia and England.  With the nasty opening halves in their first 2 games, though, it’s not out of the question for the U.S. to blow this one.  Just one goal more than the Algerians, and the U.S. move on.  But if they lose to Algeria, and England loses to Slovenia, the really horrible Algerian team will move on. Yes, Algeria over England and the United States.  Whack.  However, there is one last weird scenario. If both England and the U.S. tie, and if The Three Lions ties 2-2 with Slovenia and the U.S. ties 0-0 with Algeria (so basically, a 2 goal difference), the 2nd spot in Group C (because Slovenia would get the first spot) is decided by…

Drawing it out of a hat. Seriously. Such bull. Let’s hope that doesn’t happen, but if it does, then it’ll be the most disappointing Match play in Group C history. Well, I’m not definite on that, but I’m pretty sure.  So on 6.23.2010, let’s root like a fuckin’ gang of maniacs. Word.

Posted By The Citrus Report

The best description on the difference between American and European soccer we have ever read

The best description on the difference between American and European soccer we have ever read” posted from: The Citrus Report | Art, Culture, News, Graffiti, Music, Street Art, Clothing, Politics, Reviews

“Americans like to put together teams, even at the Pee Wee level, that are meant to win. The best soccer-playing nations build individual players, ones with superior technical skills who later come together on teams the U.S. struggles to beat. In a way, it is a reversal of type. Americans tend to think of Europeans as collectivists and themselves as individualists. But in sports, it is the opposite. The Europeans build up the assets of individual players. Americans underdevelop the individual, although most of the volunteers who coach at the youngest level would not be cognizant of that.

The American approach is the more democratic view of sport.” —Michael Sokolove, NY Times Magazine, May 31, 2010

Posted By The Citrus Report