TILT’s “Panic Room” Video

TILT – PANIC ROOM from BIG ADDICT on Vimeo.

TILT’s Panic Room, completed in the hotel Au Vieux and consisting of a hotel room with half-color bubbled graffiti and tags and half pristine white room, just released the video of the making of and process behind the piece. As TILT says, “The hotel Au vieux panier asked me to design a room, I first told them that I wasn’t interested doing just decoration in the room but I wanted to create something that will look more like an installation. I thought about it also as a huge canvas where I needed to think about the composition and play with the empty white part of the room to accentuate more the idea of Chaos on the other part. Then I asked my friend Tober who gat a great
old school style for tags, Grizz who is also the man behind the camera and Don Cho who is a Hip Hop singer from Marseille but who used to be a tagger from my home town Toulouse. It took one week to do the whole thing cause the idea was to exaggerate what you can usually see in some abandoned places. Too much tags, too much drips, too much sentences, too much throw ups … What I also wanted to show is that people can appreciate any type of graffiti, even the more basic, it’s just a matter of point of view … “

From The Citrus Report

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Swampy “In My Room” Opening Night

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We have had a bunch of openings that we have visited over the years, a bunch at FIFTY24SF Gallery in particular. But there was something in the energy on the 200 block of Fillmore Street last night, when the first patrons began walking into Swampy’s “In My Room” solo show and installation. At first, the show is clean and simple: 3 large paintings and 8 photographs. They were striking simply based on what we know of Swampy: photos of train-hopping adventures throughout North America, paintings on found objects, and of course, the now widespread and cult-created Swampy Skull Donkey icon.

But then, of course, this show was not just 3 & 8. It was a full installation, with these 11 works just as integral to the concept of the “In My Room” installation as the entire back room experience. This was a “Swampy Show,” the before and after, the work put in and the output, inside the mind and what comes out in paintings and photographs. The life, lifestyle, and the work. The adventure. The obsession. The dedication. The character.

So, of course, you lift the 3rd paintings, and climb into the world behind and inside the Swampy Donkey. Its cluttered, it moves, it makes a sound, and it gets added to but friends and casual passerbys. And most importantly, it is not permanent. —Raymond Brown / The Citrus Report

All photography by Patrick Kawahara.

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From The Citrus Report

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Oh right, like when that guy got his head stuck in an Elephant’s butt . . .

This guy maybe was slow before this, but he is definitely a slow adult after his head got stuck an elephant’s butt. Imagine when he went home to his parent’s house that night, and they asked “How was your day at the zoo, honey?” And right before he walked down the steps to his room in the basement, “Oh, I got my head stuck up an elephant’s ass, what’s for dinner?” Because this conversation actually happened at some point in this guys day. “What’s for dinner?”

From The Citrus Report

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Martin Wittfooth

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Martin Wittfooth
This Mortal Soil
By j.frede

The fragility of life is omnipresent but is also the elephant in the room even if we are  alone in the room. The average person does not dwell on this looming outcome; this is  not to say the thought is ever very far away in our thoughts.

I was recently introduced to the documentary “Flight From Death” which outlines  humans endless drive to distract themselves from the reality of death, and out of this  pursuit rose Cultures; Literature, Music, and Art. Since the very creation of these
distractions humans have used them to address the very thing they were intended to  distract us from; Death.

Martin Wittfooth’s newest body of work, Gardens, is no exception to this catch-22.

Influenced by classic painters such as Jan Van Huysum, J W Waterhouse, Albert  Bierstadt, and Arnold Böcklin. Witfooth draws from the same well as contemporary  painter Walton Ford, whom also paints in an old world style referencing field paintings  while introducing dark surrealism.

Humans are the only creatures on the planet that fear for the past and the future, which I  feel is relative in the Wittfooth’s paintings. Combining classic European sensibilities in  technique with modern darkness, Gardens gracefully presents the cycle of life in an  apparent manner while a strong under current exists that hints at our inevitable  destruction due to the global climate changes that persist. Red Soil depicts a scene of  beautiful red flowers rising out of the exposed rip cage of a dead wolf lying across a city  sidewalk as a storm drain catches the draining blood ushering it to the ocean. While  Bacchus gives us an intimidating gaze from a Baboon whose skull seems to be bursting  with grapevines that are feeding perched birds, a glass cylinder is held in his left hand  which we assume is oil from the tin sitting to his right labeled “Capital Motor Oil”  coupled with an ominous red drop icon.

The cause and effect of civilization and industrialization is a common thread in Wittfooth’s paintings. When I interviewed him for this feature I asked if he considered  himself an environmentalist or was he merely forecasting realism and he responded by
saying:

“Besides being as personally conscientious of environmental concerns as I can in my daily life, I’m not an active environmentalist, but I do attempt to trigger a reaction to a broad range of related issues under that banner through my work. That said, though, I  don’t aspire to make my work exclusively about that, or about gloomy forecasts. It’s just  that environmental topics interest and disturbs me in a way that usually find their way  into my work, and I hope to be able to in my own way contribute to the dialogue of  awareness and the collective shedding of ignorance.”

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