Making Waves | PIERRE CARREAU

Photographer, Pierre Carreau’s AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau’s images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique.  One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore.

Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, “transfer the waves’ energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.”

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (1)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (2)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (3)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (4)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (5)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (6)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (7)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (8)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (9)

The Third Dimension | JONATHAN BENAINOUS

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game “Ghost Recon: Wildlands” near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger’s work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush.

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game "Ghost Recon: Wildlands" near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger's work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush. Via news.upperplayground.com (1)

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game "Ghost Recon: Wildlands" near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger's work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush. Via news.upperplayground.com (2)

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game "Ghost Recon: Wildlands" near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger's work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush. Via news.upperplayground.com (3)

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game "Ghost Recon: Wildlands" near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger's work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush. Via news.upperplayground.com (4)

Jonathan Benainous is a 32 year old 3D artist, Senior Environment Engineer on the video game "Ghost Recon: Wildlands" near Paris. First starting off with 2D video games, Benainous quickly moved into what would be his focus and true interest, 3D art. Benainous says he was inspired by the realm of Japanimation and sci-fi hits like Akira and European artists like H.R. Giger's work on Alien. He is currently working on a personal project on sci-fi helmets he creates with ZBrush. Via news.upperplayground.com (5)

Tuesday Turnover to 2014 Paris | BORONDO

Borondo is an artist that captures our eyes and mind with his soul penetrating murals.

Walking the streets of Paris today, I was reminded of Borondo’s beautiful work of art, “Les Trois Ages,” or “The Three Generations.”

My consciousness triggered the message of how roots of a family tree and trauma are grounded and passed down generation to generation, which no one really talks about unless you regularly see a therapist and/or live in Los Angeles (which, in present day, LA, is synonymous with trauma and therapy). The imagery of the eldest person holding his child’s mouth shut and then he blinding his own child’s vision is incredibly symbolic and resonant with the way families communicate by hiding information, being blind to the truth and by continuously and unconsciously lying to ourselves and others over and over again.

If you’re interested in mapping the function and dysfunction of your own family tree, you can do so here.

Tracking your own generational patterns can be enlightening, insightful and even excruciatingly painful into finding out who you truly are. I encourage the journey and exploration of your own life. And perhaps, when you’re done, you can paint your own graffiti mural of the sublimation of self-help you encountered in the process.

Images by Jerome Thomas

Borondo is an artist that captures our eyes and mind with his soul penetrating murals. Walking the streets of Paris today, I was reminded of Borondo's beautiful work of art, "Les Trois Ages," or "The Three Generations." My consciousness triggered the message of how roots of a family tree and trauma are grounded and passed down generation to generation, which no one really talks about unless you regularly see a therapist and/or live in Los Angeles (which, in present day, LA, is synonymous with trauma and therapy). The imagery of the eldest person holding his child's mouth shut and then he blinding his own child's vision is incredibly symbolic and resonant with the way families communicate by hiding information, being blind to the truth and by continuously and unconsciously lying to ourselves and others over and over again. If you're interested in mapping the function and dysfunction of your own family tree, you can do so here. Tracking your own generational patterns can be enlightening, insightful and even excruciatingly painful into finding out who you truly are. I encourage the journey and exploration of your own life. And perhaps, when you're done, you can paint your own graffiti mural of the sublimation of self-help you encountered in the process. Via news.upperplayground.com (1)

Borondo is an artist that captures our eyes and mind with his soul penetrating murals. Walking the streets of Paris today, I was reminded of Borondo's beautiful work of art, "Les Trois Ages," or "The Three Generations." My consciousness triggered the message of how roots of a family tree and trauma are grounded and passed down generation to generation, which no one really talks about unless you regularly see a therapist and/or live in Los Angeles (which, in present day, LA, is synonymous with trauma and therapy). The imagery of the eldest person holding his child's mouth shut and then he blinding his own child's vision is incredibly symbolic and resonant with the way families communicate by hiding information, being blind to the truth and by continuously and unconsciously lying to ourselves and others over and over again. If you're interested in mapping the function and dysfunction of your own family tree, you can do so here. Tracking your own generational patterns can be enlightening, insightful and even excruciatingly painful into finding out who you truly are. I encourage the journey and exploration of your own life. And perhaps, when you're done, you can paint your own graffiti mural of the sublimation of self-help you encountered in the process. Via news.upperplayground.com (2)

Borondo is an artist that captures our eyes and mind with his soul penetrating murals. Walking the streets of Paris today, I was reminded of Borondo's beautiful work of art, "Les Trois Ages," or "The Three Generations." My consciousness triggered the message of how roots of a family tree and trauma are grounded and passed down generation to generation, which no one really talks about unless you regularly see a therapist and/or live in Los Angeles (which, in present day, LA, is synonymous with trauma and therapy). The imagery of the eldest person holding his child's mouth shut and then he blinding his own child's vision is incredibly symbolic and resonant with the way families communicate by hiding information, being blind to the truth and by continuously and unconsciously lying to ourselves and others over and over again. If you're interested in mapping the function and dysfunction of your own family tree, you can do so here. Tracking your own generational patterns can be enlightening, insightful and even excruciatingly painful into finding out who you truly are. I encourage the journey and exploration of your own life. And perhaps, when you're done, you can paint your own graffiti mural of the sublimation of self-help you encountered in the process. Via news.upperplayground.com (3)

Borondo is an artist that captures our eyes and mind with his soul penetrating murals. Walking the streets of Paris today, I was reminded of Borondo's beautiful work of art, "Les Trois Ages," or "The Three Generations." My consciousness triggered the message of how roots of a family tree and trauma are grounded and passed down generation to generation, which no one really talks about unless you regularly see a therapist and/or live in Los Angeles (which, in present day, LA, is synonymous with trauma and therapy). The imagery of the eldest person holding his child's mouth shut and then he blinding his own child's vision is incredibly symbolic and resonant with the way families communicate by hiding information, being blind to the truth and by continuously and unconsciously lying to ourselves and others over and over again. If you're interested in mapping the function and dysfunction of your own family tree, you can do so here. Tracking your own generational patterns can be enlightening, insightful and even excruciatingly painful into finding out who you truly are. I encourage the journey and exploration of your own life. And perhaps, when you're done, you can paint your own graffiti mural of the sublimation of self-help you encountered in the process. Via news.upperplayground.com (4)

 

 

“JOYEUSE OBSESSION” BY PEZ PREVIEW

by Ariadna Zierold

Head over to Paris for PEZ next solo exhibition “Joyeuse Obsession” that opened on September 3 in Galerie Celal.

Pez started painting in 1999 in his hometown Barcelona. Specifically, he got into street art writing his signature, which soon took the shape of a fish. Little by little his tags turned into the shape of a smiling blue fish, and he became a celebrity throughout Barcelona.

joyeuse obsession, pez, exhibition, paris, the citrus report, upper playground joyeuse obsession, pez, exhibition, paris, the citrus report, upper playground joyeuse obsession, pez, exhibition, paris, the citrus report, upper playground

Biro Pen Illustrations by Helena Hauss

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Paris-based illustrator Helena Hauss uses a Bic Biro pen to create finely detailed images, complete with patterns, typography and portraits in bright and contrasted colors. Hauss started drawing with Biro pens while she was supposed to be taking notes in high school. She has experimented with other mediums, but tends to prefer sticking with the Bic Biro she’s grown accustomed to. “Indeed, no other medium allows me to put so much emphasis and details into hair, reflects and patterns as I so much love to do”, says Hauss.

Check out select work from Helena below and visit helenahauss.net to see more.

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Hauss states that at times she used to feel a little ashamed for drawing primarily with a ball-point pen, but says things have changed, “in more recent years I noticed it became kind of a trend and I got to embrace it”.

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Upper Playground Releases “Weapon of Mass Creation” Pencil

Upper Playground is proud to release a classic weapon of choice for many creatives around the world. The “Weapon of Mass Creation” pencil was inspired by those who stand for freedom of creative expression.

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Following the attacks on French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the #2 pencil has become a familiar symbol of freedom against those who use violence to oppose it. Artists around the world have portrayed the pencil in illustrations and cartoons as a demonstration of defiance against violence and also of their continued support for creative freedoms. The pencil has been used in political protests, vigils and tributes across the globe.

Dylan Vermeul

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Paul Insect Charlie-Hebdo-Terrorism-Art-Cartoon-Islam-Paris-17_1024x1024

Alvaro MezaCharlie-Hebdo-Terrorism-Art-Cartoon-Islam-Paris-11_1024x1024

Rafael Mantesso
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Cheb Makhlouf
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The “Weapon of Mass Creation” Classic #2 Pencil releases this week in store and online at upperplayground.com.