Thom Yorke Tuesday: “2 + 2 = 5″

So deliberate was that guitar being plugged in at the beginning of Hail to the Thief, the 2003 Radiohead album that was purposely recorded fast and lean in Los Angeles after the laborious and rewarding Kid A / Amnesiac sessions. The opening track “2 + 2 = 5″ was the aftermath of that plugging in, and it was one of the most urgent songs the band would ever record. George W really pissed them off…

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First and Final Fridays: The Clientele “God Save the Clientele”

10206 god save the clientele First and Final Fridays: The Clientele God Save the Clientele the clientele god save the clientele first and final fridays

Of all the great Clientele albums, of which their entire canon is solid, the light Autumn buzz over 2007′s God Save the Clientele remains their finest. The London band had pushed their sound the slightest with 2005 Strange Geometry, and the opening track on God Save, “Here Comes the Phantom” is indeed our favorite. And a nice simple ending in “Dreams of Leaving” rounds it out perfectly.

From The Citrus Report

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Weakness Wednesday: Neutral Milk Hotel “King Of Carrot Flowers Part 1″

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In all honesty, music could probably just stop altogether for us if this was the last song we ever heard. Neutral Milk Hotel, “King of Carrot Flowers Part 1,” opening track to In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. Perfection. Simple.

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Weakness Wednesday: Spoon “Everything Hits At Once”

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The opening track to the album that turned Spoon into an “indie band” in the Pitchfork sense, Girls Can Tell is what got a lot of us into the Chicago moved to Austin, Texas band. And “Everything Hits At Once” was a lot of our favorite song on that album. So, here you go on Weakness Wednesday…

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The Good, the Bad, and the Thursday: Blur “Beetlebum”

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Most people will call us crazy on this one, but to Blur fans, they will understand, this could be one of the best songs about heroin of the past 20 years. A dark, moody turn in the Blur catalog, where they went from Britpop to Indie Americana, where Graham Coxon’s guitar work turned Pavement, and Damon Albarn’s almost Bacharach went more Ian Curtis / Tom Waits (we know, that isn’t really good, but it got darker and introspective). This was the opening track from the 1997, self-titled Blur album, and it continues to be one of their most timeless.

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