TRANSITORY CINEMATIC MOMENTS BY JIM GAYLORD

by Ariadna Zierold

jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground

New York City based artist Jim Gaylord‘s abstract works are often based on imagery from contemporary film and television. Combining stills from transitory cinematic moments, he transposes them to extract new compositions, which are then used as the bases for paintings and gouache on paper collages. Gaylord’s work combines meticulous figuration with obscure forms that are familiar but unrecognizable.

jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground

MODERN-DAY FOSSILS BY DORA BUDOR

by Ariadna Zierold

dora budor, sculpture, installation, cinema, film, props, movies, objectsreanimation, recontextualization, upper playground

New York-based Croatian artist Dora Budor creates sculptures and films that expose the technical and otherwise overlooked elements of movies. Budor most regularly engages with movie props—objects which are inherently fake or flawed, yet appear real and perfect on-screen—in order to “reanimate” them and give them a second life through recontextualization.

dora budor, sculpture, installation, cinema, film, props, movies, objectsreanimation, recontextualization, upper playground

A series of sculptures built around discarded movie props with artificial weathering, rust, and dust positions the objects as modern-day fossils. Budor views cinema through an anthropological lens, seeking to explore how people interact with films and the way that fictional characters become part of a collective emotional reality.

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LITERARY ADVENTURES BY ANDREW DEGRAFF

by Ariadna Zierold

andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground

Andrew DeGraff is a freelance illustrator and artist living and working in Maine. Andrew was born in Albany, NY and spent his little league years upstate. He graduated from Pratt Institute’s Communications Design program with a focus in Illustration in 2001, and he returned to Pratt to teach illustration from 2009 – 2014. He recently published his first book, Plotted: A Literary Atlas from Zest Books.

andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground

DeGraff approaches each story differently and crafts maps that truly tell stories. It’s not always easy to paint the mental picture you want if the narrative is complex, or if the writer has built a world that is incomprehensible in scope. Thanks to his talent, now you have a new way to envision some of your favorite fictional places.

andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground andrew degraff, maps, illustration, stories, movies, narratives, plotted, upper playground

ALEX PARDEE showing at “The Official Bad Robot Art Experience” – Los Angeles

Gallery1988 (West) presents The Official Bad Robot Art Experience. The group show includes nearly 100 artists who contributed artwork that was inspired by the production house’s many projects, including Lost, Revolution, Alias, Fringe and Star Trek (2009). Show will remain open until May 18th.

Alex Pardee working on his Cloverfield monster for “The Official Bad Robot Art Experience” group show in Los Angeles: AlexPardee_BadRobot_Cloverfield_LosAngeles
AlexPardee_BadRobot_Cloverfield_LosAngeles_2AlexPardee_BadRobot_Cloverfield_LosAngeles_4AlexPardee_BadRobot_Cloverfield_LosAngeles_3
All Images from @alexpardee IG

The Ides of March will win an Oscar

Not the movies that show the dark side of political life are really that interesting anymore, because the world of caring is over, but Clooney, Gosling, Giamatti, Seymour Hoffman, it is going to be big. And it looks pretty good, too. Screenplay by the Cloon, so the Right won’t see it.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Stanley Kubrick gets a unique Filmography treatment

Stanley Kubrick – a filmography – from Martin Woutisseth on Vimeo.

Martin Woutisseth, who designed this piece, and Romain Trouillet, who did the music, did a really top notch job on this Stanley Kubrick animated filmography clip. Seriously, doesn’t this just put it into perspective that Kubrick was an official master of the trade? Paths of Glory? 2001? Full Metal Jacket? Dr. Strangelove? Untouchable.

via hypebeast.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Photographs by Isaac Joel Torres

I am based out of the great city of Chicago. Go Bulls!

I take pictures of everything and anything mostly. I do this full time so anything I can get my hands on I’ll do, yet I try to be selective with the projects I choose. I like to do fashion photography the most though. That’s my main portfolio.

Uff I use a variety of camera’s. Depends on what I am looking for. Digital I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II and film I shoot with a Mamiya C330 TLR, Nikon FM2, Contax T2, Fuji Instax, and a Lomo LC-A

I had a photography class in college but I dropped out after the second time I went because it was going to be way too expensive. So technically no, I am not formally trained. All self taught.

My influences are cliche – films, music, and other artists. I look at a lot of fashion magazines and blogs. Throughout the day an Idea just jumps at me regarding a pose or style and I quickly sketch it or jot it down somewhere for future use.

Hmm I’d like to say shooting for more magazines or brands and maybe celebs. I’m not looking to be a millionaire or anything. Just want a chance to show my work, get better at it and to make people’s eyes happy and hopefully keep making a decent living. I’m thinking of trying video out. I went to school for illustration so quite possibly incorporate my illustration with my photography somehow. I’d like to show at more galleries, sell photo books and prints.

Pizza, Watches, Antique Stores, Books, Movies, Tumblr, Wine and Scotch…And working with very talented people that help me get the exposure I need. It’s great meeting new people that are honest and hard working and are always willing to help. Having beautiful subjects is of course a plus also. (Cheesy smile) All these things make me happy!

FYI I am colorblind so I see colors a bit differently then the average person. I look for detail and color in my work just as I do with my illustration. Thanks for the opportunity and please keep following my work.

Posted from Battle at 3 A.M.

Derek Gores

While flying to LA for this weekend’s 3 person exhibit at Thinkspace Gallery, collage artist Derek Gores apparently got a little light-headed (home state of Florida not offering much in the way of high-altitude experience, you understand). In his delirium, Gores was convinced that on board the plane were 5 of his idols and that now would be the perfect time for an impossible interview. Fortunately, Places Please! Theatre Company co-founder Christy Boyd was sitting in a row within earshot and documented the following casual interview featuring, Gores claims, painter Francisco Goya, author Douglas Adams, German expressionist Egon Schiele, writer/comedian/musician Steve Martin, and Louden Swain from the movie Vision Quest.

Derek Gores: I seem to get lots of ideas while driving or taking out the garbage. You think that is typical?
Doug: I don’t believe it. Prove it to me and I still won’t believe it.

Derek: I don’t care much for symbols. Well except for peanut m&m’s. If I’m eating those, it means the day is about to end like I want it to.
Doug: If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, we have at least to consider the possibility that we have a small aquatic bird of the family anatidae on our hands.

Derek: I like telling kids that artists are the ones who get to come up with the future. What do you guys tell fourth graders on career day?

Steve:  A day without sunshine is, you know, night.
Egon:  To restrict the artist is a crime. It is to murder germinating life.

Louden: Yeah, I’m thinking very seriously of becoming a gynecologist

Doug:  Flying is learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.

Derek: A child asked me recently why I make “more pictures of girls than boys”. My best guess was that I already know lots of boy stuff, and that girl stuff was more mysterious to me. And artists explore what’s mysterious. I look to find the strength and the individual on the canvas, even when it is out of my head.

Steve: You know what your problem is, it’s that you haven’t seen enough movies – all of life’s riddles are answered in the movies.
Frank:  The act of painting is about one heart telling another heart where he found salvation.
Egon: I do not deny that I have made drawings and watercolors of an erotic nature. But they are always works of art. Are there no artists who have done erotic pictures?

At present, I am mainly observing the physical motion of mountains, water, trees and flowers. One is everywhere reminded of similar movements in the human body, of similar impulses of joy and suffering in plants.

Doug: (glances at Egon) Isn’t it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?

Derek: I like natural. Who’s with me?

(crickets)

I remember as a kid my dad showing me those long exposure portraits of Abe Lincoln from the Civil War days, and thinking that you could sense the extra time in the picture. I think that is part of the origin of my interest in making my work not feel like just a frozen moment. Does time play a role in your work?

Louden: All I ever settled for is that we’re born to live and then to die, and… we got to do it alone, each in his own way. And I guess that’s why we got to love those people who deserve it like there’s no tomorrow. ‘Cause when you get right down to it – there isn’t.

Frank:  The object of my work is to report the actuality of events.

Doug: For a moment, nothing happened. Then, after a second or so, nothing continued to happen. I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.

Derek: Sometimes the art is excruciating to make. Sometimes good… sometimes hard, but still good. I want to and choose to feel it all, and use it.
Steve: Comedy is the art of making people laugh without making them puke.

Derek: And finally, I’m thinking of starting a campaign that the word Art should be capitalized. Is there a difference between art and Art?
Steve: I believe entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become Art, but if you set out to make ART you’re an idiot. And, p.s. Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.
Egon: Art cannot be modern. Art is primordially eternal.
Frank: Fantasy, abandoned by reason, produces impossible monsters; united with it, she is the mother of the Arts and the origin of marvels.
Doug:  (sighs) The difficulty with this conversation is that it’s very different from most of the ones I’ve had of late. Which, as I explained, have mostly been with trees.

Derek: Thanks so much for meeting with me, it’s an honor… like a dream really. What are all of you planning to do next?
Steve: A pile of near-misses.

Egon: The war is over – and I must go. My paintings should be shown in museums worldwide. …

Louden: Last week I turned 18. I wasn’t ready for it. I haven’t done anything yet. So I made this deal with myself. This is the year I make my mark.

Doug: (sighs again) The mere thought hadn’t even begun to speculate about the merest possibility of crossing my mind.

Thank you to Derek Gores, Christy Boyd, and Ronnie Wrest.

See if Gores has recovered from jet lag at this Saturday’s (March 12) THINKSPACE opening:

http://thinkspacegallery.com/

http://www.derekgores.com/

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Francis Ford Coppola on Modern Filmmaking

Posted from The Citrus Report

We like Francis Ford Coppola’s rules for filmmaking: 1) Write and direct original screenplays, 2) make them with the most modern technology available, and 3) self-finance them. But it is not like FFC came up with this idea while sipping red wine in Napa. This is a career of evolving and progressing and making mistakes and then not making mistakes.

There is a great interview with Coppola on The99Percent, where he riffs a bit on his career, and the modern filmmaker.

A good exchange:

Why did you choose not to teach a master class?

For me in cinema there are few masters. I have met some masters – Kurosawa, Polanski – but I am a student.

I just finished a film a few days ago, and I came home and said I learned so much today. So if I can come home from working on a little film after doing it for 45 years and say, “I learned so much today,” that shows something about the cinema. Because the cinema is very young. It’s only 100 years old.

Even in the early days of the movies, they didn’t know how to make movies. They had an image and it moved and the audience loved it. You saw a train coming into the station, and just to see motion was beautiful.

The cinema language happened by experimentation – by people not knowing what to do. But unfortunately, after 15-20 years, it became a commercial industry. People made money in the cinema, and then they began to say to the pioneers, “Don’t experiment. We want to make money. We don’t want to take chances.”

An essential element of any art is risk. If you don’t take a risk then how are you going to make something really beautiful, that hasn’t been seen before? I always like to say that cinema without risk is like having no sex and expecting to have a baby. You have to take a risk.

You try to go to a producer today and say you want to make a film that hasn’t been made before; they will throw you out because they want the same film that works, that makes money. That tells me that although the cinema in the next 100 years is going to change a lot, it will slow down because they don’t want you to risk anymore. They don’t want you to take chances. So I feel like [I’m] part of the cinema as it was 100 years ago, when you didn’t know how to make it. You have to discover how to make it.

Read the rest here.

Posted By The Citrus Report