BIZARRE AWKWARDNESS BY POLINA TERESHINA

by Ariadna Zierold

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Russian-born painter Polina Tereshina interprets her feeling of being between cultures, neither purely Russian nor American—a little of both. An abstract sense of statelessness is reflected in characters that move and interact within a fantastical geometric playground that is detailed yet vague.

polina tereshina, illustration, people, bearded, awkward, bizarre, minimalist, pastel, watercolor, russia, upper playground

She has a love for the awkward and bizarre aspects of our daily lives, so much so that she interprets them through her abstract, figurative paintings. Using acrylic, ink, and watercolor, she disassembles the body to arrive at a newly resolved aspect, one which speaks more clearly to the reality of our movements.

polina tereshina, illustration, people, bearded, awkward, bizarre, minimalist, pastel, watercolor, russia, upper playground

The rigid lines of the geometric and lined backgrounds add a sense of control to the piece, one which the subject interacts around. This brings balance, along with the idea of limits and structure. Through this we can relate to the modified human. By simplifying the body to the elemental aspects of the figure, often just a silhouette, she draws the viewer into the exaggerated trait.

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DREAMSCAPE INTERIORS BY HIROYUKI ISHII

by Ariadna Zierold

hiroyuki ishii, ilustration, minimalist, line, interior, landscape, japanese, rooms, dreamscape, upper playground

Tokyo-based illustrator Hiroyuki Ishii produces minimalist, digital line drawings of surreal interior landscapes, influenced by Japanese art, Italian design and RPG (role playing) video games.

hiroyuki ishii, ilustration, minimalist, line, interior, landscape, japanese, rooms, dreamscape, upper playground

A series of surreal illustrations based on rooms features a Dalí-esque dreamscape imagery filtered through Hiroyuki’s simple style. Explaining how he conceives the content, Hiroyuki said: “What’s in the room. What will happens in there… I wanted to see what kind of feeling you can get if you are in there with unusual items and interiors.”

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Zen-inspired Minimalist Artwork by Dhavebaj Anupabsthian (@dhavebaj)

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Thailand based artist and photographer Dhavebaj Anupabsthian (@dhavebaj) creates mesmerizing minimalist images by merging his photography with graphic editing apps on his iPhone and tablet. Anupabsthian is keenly aware of symmetry in his Zen-inspired artwork, “I try to choose the proper lines to be in the background that suits the emotion,” he says.

Take a look at select images from Dhavebaj below and check out his popular Instagram account @dhavebaj to see more of his work.

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Amanda Gordon Dunn

Posted from The Citrus Report

AMANDA GORDON DUNN
Form Follows Fiction
By j.frede

Sexy is rarely a word I use to describe art and even more so when referring to sculpture, but Sexy is an apt description for the work of Amanda Gordon Dunn. Combining sleek form, perfect lines & elegant shapes with brilliant colors Amanda Gordon Dunn explores a variety of conceptual ideas with her current body of work that ranges from her identifying loved ones with 70s muscle cars to the futurist set design of classic science fiction movies, which is the basis for her upcoming show The Landscapes of Science Fiction.

Dunn’s wall-reliant structures are graceful and mysterious and seemingly lay somewhere between Ellsworth Kelly and Anish Kapoor. The simple nature of her work echoes the minimalist movement of the 1960s and 1970s and perhaps not coincidently is also decades that produced the Science Fiction films that inspired her new exhibition.

“I recently revisited the film Barbarella and was blown away by the tremendous forms, color and bizarre landscapes/set design. This sudden fascination fueled a nerd-crazed hunt into other sci-fi cult classics such as Logan’s Run, Solaris and Dune. My childhood favorites came into the equation with rediscovering old fantasy comic books and novels and old TV shows like He-Man and Thunder cats.” Dunn continues, “From these I created specific understructures that can be seen as a universal form throughout the show. Each wall-reliant sculpture has large, bulbous growths that emerge from candy apple finishes. When the viewer is standing in front of the work it creates a disorienting optical reflection like one may see from a spaceship or in Jane Fonda’s space suit. The sculptures are named after specific science fiction planets, such as “Thundra” (home planet of the Thunder Cats).”

Posted By The Citrus Report