UNEXPECTED JUXTAPOSITIONS BY SAM JEDIG

by Ariadna Zierold

san jedig, juxtaposition, collage, painting, faces, culture, upper playground

Sam Jedig‘s works raise an question about how we interpret ourselves and reality as it is presented to us through the steady flow of images of mass culture. The fragments of images in the works have been removed from their original context in what concerns both time and place. The safe and well-known world is turned upside-down by these new and unexpected juxtapositions. Sam Jedig’s point is that this “real world” only exists as long as we, together, maintain and confirm its existence.

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AMAZING JUXTAPOSITIONS BY YOSUKE UENO

by Ariadna Zierold

yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground

Yosuke Ueno is a self-taught Japanese artist, working in the style of pop surrealism. Born in Japan in 1977, he has been creating his unique and colorful world since his early age, and as a result Ueno’s first solo exhibition was in 1994 in Yamaguchi, when he was just 16 years old.

yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground

Weird, creepy but in a beautiful kind of way, Ueno’s art stands out for its interesting juxtapositions and hidden symbolism. Skulls, swans, scissors and amazing characters appear in his paintings, making you wonder what kind of hidden message they all carry.

yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground yosuke ueno, illustration, painting, japanese, pop, surrealism, colorful, detailed, juxtaposition, symbolism, characters, upper playground

Kevin Van Aelst

Posted from The Citrus Report

In a world of large important ideas, sometimes the small ordinary things get lost or maybe just overlooked.  Kevin Van Aelst takes these seemingly unimportant everyday items and gives them a new existence.  His arranged photos give the viewer an intimate look into how everyday items can connect with larger objects and ideas in the artist’s mind.  This juxtaposition of a large, realistic idea created from materials that are small and seemingly insignificant and then placed in a staged, unrealistic arrangement create a thought provoking interaction with the viewer.  The work is tangible, lighthearted, intelligent and above all, it is refreshing. —Ronnie Wrest/The Citrus Report

Hi Kevin, what did you have for breakfast?

My breakfast consists of a giant bowl of cereal, a couple cups of coffee, and about an hour of catching up on emails, and maybe a tv show on hulu.  I start my day nice and slow, but it’s not long before I get sucked into a tornado of busyness.
You studied psychology before photography.  What pushed your decision to focus on photo?

I had taken up photography as a hobby in college, and after I graduated, I decided to take a chance on pursuing something I truly loved rather than what my degree was in.  I applied to graduate school, and luckily ended up in the MFA program at the Hartford Art School.

Did your psych studies play a role in some of the concepts for your art?

I certainly think my fascination with the thought process had a big influence on my art.  What I studied in psychology focused on decision making and all the things that influence how we act and how we think.  My immediate interests in art and photography were about perception and ideas, and how an image could evoke a question or thought or idea to ponder.

Do you enjoy teaching?

I love teaching.  Students can be so inspiring to me, with their enthusiasm and different ways of seeing and thinking.  Trying to be inspiring to them certainly keeps me on my toes.  Teaching is also great motivation for me to keep learning and studying, so that I have more to share.
What else are you busy with right now?

Tons of things:  planning the construction of a new studio in the backyard, filling out grade reports for my high school students, planning a wedding, making a shopping list for the props and materials I need for my next New York Times Shoot (where does one find fiber optic cables, and laboratory goggles, anyway?), and putting together a slide lecture for class.   And there’s always lots of ideas floating around in my head that I’m anxious to find the studio time to play around with.

Posted By The Citrus Report