MULTI-LAYERED VISUAL EXPERIENCE BY JAMES RAWSON

by Ariadna Zierold

james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground

 

James Rawson currently lives and works in Norfolk, England as a postmodern pop artist. Predominantly working in the medium of collage and painting, Rawson found no inspiration in the beautiful Norfolk landscape he grew up in; instead, the landscape of pop culture fed his artistic drive.

james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground

James’ work blurs the boundaries between collage and painting, using preparatory paper collages as reference for his larger paintings. He aims to reflect the multi-layered visual experience we all live in. Appropriating the very images that have become implicit in our society, his imagery disturbs our sense of reality and confuses our perception of popular culture. Rawson’s paintings address some of the most important issues of the last 50 years; over consumption, greed, inequality and life as a spectacle. It deals with the ubiquity of advertising, sex selling everything, fast food and TV as the drug of a nation.

james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground james rawson, collage, painting, images, pop culture, consumption, spectacle, advertising, tv, upper playground

Making Waves | PIERRE CARREAU

Photographer, Pierre Carreau’s AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau’s images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique.  One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore.

Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, “transfer the waves’ energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.”

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (1)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (2)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (3)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (4)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (5)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (6)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (7)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (8)

Photographer, Pierre Carreau's AquaViva series effortlessly carries the range of the human condition in wave-like forms. Carreau's images of waves, each distinct from the other, captures a flash in time that is often unseen by the human eye. Carreau suspends each wave to expose its life, feeling and purpose, similar to the expression of emotional states in humans, such that feelings are universal, but the expression through an individual is what makes the experience unique. One cannot help but feel the formlessness of the bountiful ocean and its kinetic energy thrusting to shore. Carreau describes the goal of his work is to, "transfer the waves' energy to those who view them. Water is amazing, it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light." Via news.upperplayground.com (9)

Saner

Screen shot 2012 03 15 at 4.47.18 PM1 Saner saner Mexico City FIFTY24SF Gallery

FIFTY24SF Gallery, in association with Upper Playground, is pleased to announce Corazón Sangrante (Bleeding Heart), an exhibition featuring new works from Mexico City-based fine artist, Saner. After showing at our sister gallery, FIFTY24MX in Mexico City, this will be Saner’s first exhibition in our San Francisco space. The exhibition opens March 16, 2011.

Saner is a leading member of contemporary muralists and fine artists working in both Latin America and Europe. His mural work has been inspired by the Mexican Muralist Movement and David Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco, and Diego Rivera. For this exhibition, Saner will be presenting new paintings and drawings on paper, featuring his signature animal and human hybrid characters. His fine artwork is inspired and informed by research into Mexican custom and folklore, mysticism, masks, and skulls. The character’s most basic rituals are laid bare in each painting, allowing the viewer to see inside Saner’s personal symbology. As written by FIFTY24MX curator Liliana Carpinteyro, Saner’s “free and unpretentious spirit allows him to express a new Mexican vision.”

Saner (Edgar Flores) titled this exhibition “Corazón Sangrante” (Bleeding Heart), while reflecting on the things he saw around him: violence, anger, happiness, anxiety, and fear. Saner says these are the issues that most Mexicans deal with as part of a daily ration of “food”: junk food that is “consuming the body of a society that is getting closer to it’s destruction, unless the blood warriors awake,” he says.

Using the contrasts of lights-shadows and light-darkness, Saner reflects the eternal battle of men, his images referring to that absurd struggle of daily survival, exposing chaos as the background for resurrection. Those who see their reflection in these images will be reunited with the impossible dream, a utopia of mirrors that nobody wants to recognize and to which all escaped. Why change if the tide has not affected us yet?

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From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Mark King

mk citrus1 Mark King Photographer mark king interview barbados

The uniquely crafted and well thought out visual design of Barbados-based photographer Mark King – aka “Markings” has an instantly recognizable character and unique voice. Through his lens, he’s been able to capture and bring out the vibrant beauty of Caribbean culture while letting the vitality that celebrates the rich pageant of city living come through in a palate of sonorous colors. – James Pawlish / The Citrus Report

JP: Who is Mark King?

MK: Marking’s

Was there a single defining moment that influenced your decision to become a photographer?

I started to consider doing photography full time after working in New York as a photo intern. Going to grad school in San Francisco for photography was another big influencer. Soon after graduation, I worked as a photo assistant with Wired Magazine. I learned so much from that experience. My time at Wired gave me the confidence to try my hand at becoming a photographer.

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I know you’ve had the opportunity to travel the world shooting photos. How has your style developed since you left the city by the bay?

San Francisco is where I laid the foundation for my style. I was able to identify what I enjoyed shooting and the approach that worked best for me. Being uprooted from the Bay took me out of my comfort zone for sure. At the time the economy was (still is) wrecked and getting sponsored to stay in the country had fallen through two weeks before my time was up.

I moved to Barbados and decided the only option was to shoot as much as possible. I built on a style I began a couple years before I left SF. And later included shooting portraits in that vein. I’ve had to become much more out going and take a few risks along the way.

Now that you’re back in Barbados, how does it feel? What’s the art scene like? Has it helped influence or shape your work in anyway?

Being back in the Caribbean turned out be just what I needed. It was definitely a culture shock returning to this part of the world though. I grew up in Barbados between ages three and seven, but would come back for holiday every now and then to see family. From ages seven to twelve I was in The Bahamas, then Belgium, Washington D.C., and San Francisco. So I went from fourteen years of city life to living on a rock in the middle of the ocean not found on most maps.

Since day one I’ve strived to represent Barbados in a way no one has done before. I want my approach to be as honest as possible. Honest in the sense that it is created from a place that involves a real experience and not an over glossed one.

Our art scene is very small, but there are people working on changing that. If it weren’t for the support of a select few here I wouldn’t be on the path that I’m on now. They’ve taught me how to be resourceful and to stay motivated.

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A large portion of your work is centered on the female form. Is there any specific reason why?

I like taking pictures of beautiful women for the obvious reasons, but it’s also about the collaborative experience. We get to learn a bit about each other and do some exploring in the process. It’s always interesting to see how their personalities begin to unravel once we start shooting.

Another reason is that I find it challenging to take interesting photos of women. You see so many images dealing with that subject matter. There is an absurd amount of pictures of gorgeous women both online and in print, but in how many of them do you appreciate what is going on in the photograph in addition to the pretty girl?

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Can you briefly describe your creative process?

For my portraits I like to identify a mood that I am going for in my photos. I then think about a location that best suits the mood. There’s some pre-visualization that goes on, but often preconceived ideas can get thrown out once I’m in the process of shooting. I like to give myself some room to be spontaneous as well.

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Do you find that film, arts, or literature has had an impact on your work?

Photography, film, music, my environment; they influence me the most I guess. More and more literature is playing a role in motivating me to convey a deeper meaning in my work.

These days, everyone seems to be shooting digital. However, I know you still like to shoot with film. What is it you like about film? Do you feel it has a specific quality?

Film definitely has a certain quality that I still love. I’m not against digital. I find it hard to convince myself to shoot digital and then turn around and make it look as close to film as possible.

I approach photography in a completely different way when shooting film. I focus more when not distracted by a preview image popping up on my display. That can lead to me checking the histogram and the second guessing starts. When shooting film I just do my thing and trust my gut.

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Can you tell us a little bit more about your “plastic” series? How did you first come up with the idea? How has it evolved since then?

We love bright colors in the Caribbean. When I returned to Barbados I immediately noticed the colored plastic shopping bags everywhere. It was interesting to see these Chinese made plastic bags stand out in our color-saturated environment. I started shooting the bags themselves in studio and on the beaches. It wasn’t until I was experimenting on an instant film portrait series in preparation for an upcoming Silkscreen artist in residency at the Frans Masereel Centre (www.fransmasereelcentrum.be) in Belgium, that it all came together. I decided to pull from the shopping bag color palette instead of photographing the bags.

The project has evolved into a series of portraits shot at night under streetlights around Barbados. I shoot with a Mamiya RZ 67 on Fuji high-speed instant film. My subjects are in locations that are mostly scouted days or even weeks prior to the shoot. I scan the images and paint in the colors via a Wacom tablet. I also produced a series of screen printed artist proofs and mixed my colors the old fashioned way.

The on-going series has definitely taken an eerie turn and I’m starting to experiment with adding more of a story aspect.

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You were recently accepted to the Lucie Foundation E-apprentice program. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

Every year the Lucie Foundation selects 10 emerging photographers and pairs them with an established photographer for a 6-month online mentorship program. They also provide secondary mentors in the supporting industries like artist representatives and gallerists.

I have been paired with entertainment and fine art photographer Roger Erickson (erickson-images.com). We talk over the phone and exchange emails often. Roger has been a great help. He’s twenty years deep in the photography game. I come away from every conversation we have with amazing insight and advice.

What’s one word that describes Mark King?

Adventurous.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Herbert Baglione in Rome for Outdoor Festival

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We always love a good mural from our friend from Sao Paulo, Herbert Baglione, and this new one in Rome for the Outdoor Festival is one of the best we have seen. You can’t go wrong with those scratches. Beautiful work remixed with chaos.

Street Art News had the images.

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From The Citrus Report

Anthropocene Extinction: A Site Specific Installation by Swoon at the ICA/Boston

 Anthropocene Extinction: A Site Specific Installation by Swoon at the ICA/Boston swoon ica boston

CA Adjunct Curator Pedro Alonzo sat down with the artist recently to hear more about her work and process:

PA: With regard to your creative process, you mentioned how your work is about traveling and observing the world. Could you talk a bit about that?

SWOON: Well, I like to travel a lot primarily just to get a global perspective, and also to get a sense of how people are surviving and making do all over the world. When I travel I try to seek out various peoples’ movements; I’m interested in how people are self-organizing. I try to weave these stories into my working process…I find them so inspiring. I feel like so many of these stories point toward something bigger about the way we can all survive in the world.

PA: A lot of the images seem to either portray people who have been left behind by globalization, or in other cases, your friends who are opting out of a world reliant on globalization. Are you trying to represent their stories in your work?

SWOON: I think in an intuitive way. Sometimes I’m actively seeking those kinds of images, like the time that I drew women who were self-unionizing in Mexico, or the kids who were living on the other side of the wall in Palestine. I’m definitely seeking out some of that, and also feel like so much of the community that I have built myself over the years has been about people who are trying to find other ways of living.

Posted by FIFTY24SF Gallery

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Jacob Aue Sobol “Sabine”

Sab 24 Jacob Aue Sobol Sabine sabine Photography Jacob Aue Sobol greenland Denmark

Travelling in Greenland can be a humbling experience. That, at least, is the impression one gets reading Knud Rasmussen’s introduction to the account of the first Thule expedition in 1912: Many of the joys and experiences the travelling man finds worthy of writing down may be found naive and insignificant by the more blasé city dweller, but I have not sought to disguise this by feigning a sense of superiority I do not possess. It is my belief that total abandonment is the result of openness to the moment. As the words imply, this vast country, with its coldness, wide open spaces and hardy population needs no dramatic staging in order to communicate with its audience. Greenland is best spoken about in a low voice. It is large enough in itself.

This attitude is echoed in the work of the 23 year-old Dane, Jacob Aue Sobol, travelling to East Greenland at the beginning of the new millennium. Neither his images nor his words shout. Even though his camera captures violent images there is no showing off. The intensity of the images emerges from the unspoken, the ambivalent, the understated. Sobol originally set out to take photographs in Tiniteqilaaq. Even the name of the place implies the ends of the earth: The strait that runs dry at low tide. After five weeks he had had enough. He took his black and white photographs and headed home – albeit with the sense that his village portrait was distorted. Four months later he returned to face the small society that had far more layers and levels of meaning than he had seen at first.

And that is when Greenland captures him. The mountain landscape lies transparent and luminous, and the frozen waters lure him. He makes friends among the hunters, who take it upon themselves to train him. When this new existence suddenly starts to function – despite the arctic cold he can provide himself with food – the pampered motherland to the south shrinks into the pallid past and he resolves to test his strength against East Greenland’s basic, existential challenges. But behind this decision lies his true motivation: Falling in love with Sabine.

The cover photograph leads with the love theme. Through the small heart-shaped window of her fingers the main character sends a signal to the photographer who, his hands in the same position, snaps his rectangular counter-signal – a picture that frames and captures everything. The game begins. The diary excerpts provide us with glimpses of his selfappointed education – as the provider-to-be at the sealing net, as the fisherman on the ice, as the ’husband’ in the shower – and dig deeper into his growing self-realization through notes on cultural clashes, chapters on the Piteraq storm, or close encounters with death. The photographs are less fragmentary, structurally linked through a series of ’exterior’ pictures wrapped around a sequence of ’interior’ pictures, more often than not with Sabine as their subject and focus. Yet concentrated glimpses (like the split seal on the bathroom floor) also link nature and the struggle for survival with a steaming eroticism. The pelting ice storms that alternate with the silence of the arctic darkness surrounding the house imply an unpredictability mirrored in Sabine’s changing expressions – passionate, arch, childishly unselfconscious, demoniacal, tender, headstrong, jealous, cool, devastated. The camera strikes like the erratic shifts in temperature indoors and out. The outcome is uncertain. We stand, sit and lie with the photographer, wondering at the chaos, the riddle of lines. Two central images depart from this series: An interior shot meeting the direct gaze of a group of happy Greenlanders – classical pre-colonial openness were it not for the girl in the centre shutting us out with her folded arms and the confrontational look on her unsmiling face. And an exterior bird’s-eye view of a large group of villagers gathered as a community at a funeral. Both images depict the solidarity village life demands and depends upon, whilst leaving a crack open for a contradictory gaze: The gaze that registers the man with the camera eye, the outsider, the Dane.

For as it gradually emerges goodwill is not enough. Not even love can bridge the gap when the abyss is as bottomless as that between two cultures in disintegration and crisis. Sabine’s small, passionate heart-shaped window on the cover is captured and reflected in Jacob’s photographic rectangle. Here the denouement is established: The ups and downs of love delineate the story and are – presumably – abandoned on the last page. Is it the sensitive artist that gives shape and meaning to life through his work, or is it the woman, life and destiny that hews the man and makes him an artist? Or is it just the inescapable: The strait that runs dry at low tide?

Finn Thrane
Director, Museet for Fotokunst, Odense, Denmark

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http://www.auesobol.dk/

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Stacey Rozich

Kochinko sm 605x806 Stacey Rozich Stacey Rozich interview

Fine artist and illustrator Stacey Rozich makes work inspired from many different folk and indigenous traditions that is very unique.  There is just something about the beastly shamanic figures that pulls the viewer directly into the scene.  Many of the images conceal emotions and angst behind beautiful renderings of mask and costume.  Her precise use of color and gesture articulate these emotions perfectly.  Not every image is so heavy, some are friendly and whimsical, some make you think, while others make you laugh.  Stacey’s unique ability to connect with her viewers on a personal and emotional level, are what sets her work apart. —Ronnie Wrest / The Citrus Report

What does a normal day look like for you right now?

I’m sort of in an odd transitional state right now: I just finished up design school here in Seattle and immediately (literally at 7 am the next morning) I caught a flight out to Georgia, then went to Los Angeles and now am back. I’m still reeling and trying to gather my brains so I can get started on a mountain of work that has been waiting for me. Since my days are trying to re-adjust themselves, I’ll give you what I’d like a normal day to look like for me. Wake up around 8 am, fix myself a little something to eat then get to some e-mailing. Probably check out a few of my favorite blogs (Forme-foryou.comNomealone.Blogspot.com, Design Sponge, among others), watch a couple kitty videos and then see whats on the project roster for the day. If I’m on schedule with my work I’ll allow myself to go out that evening and meet friends for a drink or watch a movie. If I’m off, well, you can bet I am not leaving this table until I am finished or I am in big trouble.

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You obviously welcome being busy, but is there a limit? Do you like having multiple projects going at once?

The last two years of juggling a really intense school program with still trying to stay relevant in my personal work was tough and really showed me what a busy schedule would do to my life. Luckily, after some snappy outbursts at roommates, family, etc. I have perservered and found a good balance to work and not being a lunatic. I think I might be addicted to the busy, if I find I’m not as busy I actually get panicked and don’t know what to do with myself. It’s interesting how the psyche can adjust to one pace of working and can go into malfunction mode once it’s diverted. I do enjoy working on several projects at once because it really pushes me to expand my inspiration and creativity to different places I didn’t even know I could go.

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I know you put a lot of research into work.  What are a couple traditions that have inspired your work lately?

While I was in LA, I set aside to have a museum day where I went to the Getty and the LACMA. At the Getty I was totally enthralled with the pre-Renaissance era religious imagery of Northern and Central Europe. It is so ornate and beautifully patterned, and I love how all of the figures in the artwork all look so sad. On the other end of the spectrum, at the LACMA they had an exhibit of indigenous Pacific Islander artifacts and that also got me running around snapping photos for inspiration. It was a whole different take on cultural traditions, this one deeply rooted in tribal spirituality portrayed in minutely detailed wooden carvings and (real!) chained human skulls.

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Some of your work provokes strong emotions, is this a part of your plan or is some of it personal reflection?

Well, I am honored any time someone approaches me with a certain emotional reaction (luckily, always good ones). Truthfully that is never what I set out to do, I think that is why I am still so pleased and humbled when a viewer does take away a personal feeling that my work gave them. I think a lot of it personal. I’ve always had an imagination in turbo-drive ever since I was a kid but it was always very private for me. This constant internal narrative has shaped me into how I operate today and how I approach different pieces that translates itself into work that is evocative to others.

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I read that you are a bit of foody…top three meals?

Oh boy, I’m going to put away the Sweet Tarts I’m eating and think about this. Number 1: Fresh shucked oysters on Hood Canal, about an hour and a half outside of Seattle. Surprisingly being in the land of incredible shell fish, a lot of restaurants around here can really screw up a good thing.  When you get it straight from the source it’s incredible. Number 2: When I was in Georgia, my boyfriend and I visited his brother and his family and he is quite the self-taught chef. He hand-made fettucine and marinara sauce which you’d think would be a pretty standard meal. But no, oh no, it was light and fresh and one of the most amazing meals I’ve ever eaten and I don’t think I could ever recreate it. Number 3: Anything my father cooks outside that the whole family can enjoy on a warm night on the deck. It seldom ever gets warm enough to eat outside here so anytime we can it’s memorable.

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What are you working on right now?

Simultaneously working on Earth’s vol II artwork, work for a solo show at Portland’s Compound Gallery opening August 6th, finishing up a large commission for a collector in Malaysia and putting the final touches on a few graphics for Upper Playground t-shirts.

What else do you have planed for this year?

A few big projects I can’t make public quite yet, but they will be amazing, wonderful and very exciting. Aside from branding my work onto useable/wearable commodities, I’ve got a few shows in the works, commissions and — fingers crossed — a trip of the International variety. You can always stay in touch with me here: http://blog.staceyrozich.com

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From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

The Kiss Heard Round The World

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It’s nice to know a kiss still matters. In the midst of the bizarre riots in Vancouver, BC after the Game 7 loss in the Stanley Cup Finals by the beloved Canucks, riots broke out across the beautiful city.

Rich Lam/Getty Images took the photo, and told the London Guardian “I was about 20 or 30 yards away,” he said. “There were these two people on the ground in this empty street. Initially I thought one of them was hurt.”

“It was complete chaos. Rioters set two cars on fire and then I saw looters break the window at a neighbouring department store,” he said.

“At that point, the riot police charged right towards us. After I stopped running, I noticed in the space behind the line of police that two people were lying in the street with the riot police and a raging fire just beyond them.

“I knew I had captured a ‘moment’ when I snapped the still forms against the backdrop of such chaos but it wasn’t until later when I returned to the rink to file my photos that my editor pointed out that the two people were not hurt, but kissing.”

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report