RETIRED JERSEYS BY CHRIS BAKAY

by Ariadna Zierold

chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground

Chris Bakay is a multidisciplinary visual artist living and working in Houston, TX. His work is informed by past personal experiences as well as commentary on human nature. Born in 1977, in Atlanta, GA, he studied Design at The Creative Circus.

chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground

In his series “Retired Jerseys”, he works with hanging sculptures made from cast UV-stable epoxy resin. Some are clear or tinted while others are vintage shirt designs re-imagined as clear or translucent versions of their original selves. Simply put, clear is a metaphor for the intangibility of memory. Some are accentuated with objects from the time period they represent. These include vintage fake Oakley sunglasses, a vintage Drakkar Noir cologne sample, vintage yellow Sony Sports headphones and a vintage pager to name a few.

chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground chris bakay, houston, retired jerseys, sculptures, epoxy, resin, tshirts, jerseys, jersey, upper playground

POETIC IMAGES BY JOHAN BARRIOS

by Ariadna Zierold

johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground

Colombian, Houston-based artist Johan Barrios‘ work is a universe of images in movement, whose language goes in search of different features of sonorous expressions, synchronic or asynchronous visuals, elements of action, gestures and silhouettes that pierce his paintings as an ascending vanishing line that sequentially runs through every painting so as to make us understand the meaning of interval between one image and the next, which shows us the power that is communicated by the images and the perceptive impact that stems from viewing a painting and the communicational impression it leaves on us.

johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground

This vibe creates a balance with the levity and the lightness of their bodies and with the body of the artist himself, who announces his presence in the painting, not in an explicit way, but rather from the stealthy perspective of someone who is observing in order to put together, quietly and precisely, the outlines of his characters.

johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground johan barrios, painting, houston, abstract, portraiture, ghostly, monochromatic, dark, upper playground

Thom Yorke Tuesday: “Identikit” Live in Houston

So very nice to see in 2012, Radiohead is still making good tunes and having an experimental go at traditional rock music 20+ years into their career. “Identikit,” wherever it ends up, however it ends up, is a simple, beautiful two-part harmony and vocal line with signature Radiohead guitar work. Enjoy.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Herbert Baglione

Screen shot 2011 07 20 at 9.42.18 PM 605x404 Herbert Baglione website new site Herbert Baglione Brazil

One of our favorite artists, and friend, Herbert Baglione, just updated and opened a new website, featuring a bunch of works that previously were hard to find from the past 3 years. As you may already know, Herbert is a Brazilian artist based in Sao Paulo, who has had his Visa revoked from traveling within the United States after a mistake at Houston’s airport in late 2007. Because we haven’t seen Herbert since his solo show at Lazarides Gallery in London in 2008, we wanted to make sure we see his art. His bodies of work continue to be some of the most thought-provoking, introspective creations we have see each year. —Raymond Brown / The Citrus Report.

http://www.herbertbaglione.com.br/

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From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Eric Shaw

Where do you live?
Sag Harbor NY

What kind of artist are you?
i haven’t thought much about what kind of artist I am.

How would you describe your work?
Obsessive!

Where do you draw inspiration from, and are there any particular artists you look up to?
Flowers right now.

Any upcoming shows, projects, or adventures?
SF in July, Houston in Jan 2012

What makes you happy?
Back massages.

See more of his work here

Posted from Battle at 3 A.M.

Takeshi Murata Opening at Ratio 3 Tonight

TMURATA EMAIL 605x409 Takeshi Murata Opening at Ratio 3 Tonight Takeshi Murata ratio 3 popeye i get your ass to mars

We posted a while ago about Takeshi Murata’s “I, Popeye,” film which will have it’s West Coast premiere at ‘Get Your Ass To Mars’ tonight at Ratio 3. Here’s the rest of the press release:

Takeshi Murata: Get Your Ass to Mars
April 29 – June 11, 2011
Ratio 3, 1447 Stevenson Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 USA

Opening reception: Friday, April 29, 2011, 6-8pm.

Ratio 3 is pleased to present Get Your Ass to Mars, new work by Takeshi Murata, on view from April 29 to June 11, 2011.

For this exhibition, Murata will present a new series of prints using imagery rendered entirely on the computer. As in his previous work, Murata uses objects that already exist in the world, playing with their inherent narratives and associations. Murata’s still lifes are composed of arranged objects such as VHS cassette tapes, fruit, skulls, cracked iPhones, musical instruments, and beer bottles. He places these objects in a virtual space that appears eerily real, accentuating their strange relationships with each other as they rest in a timeless abstract space. With these prints, Murata moves in the opposite direction of time-based video, emphasizing stillness, tension and pictorial illusion.

The gallery will also present the West Coast debut of “I, Popeye,” which premiered in 2010 in the exhibition ‘Free’ at the New Museum, New York. By animating Popeye in three dimensions, Murata’s personal interpretation of Popeye casts a dark yet humorous shadow on the iconic cartoon character. As in his previous videos, Murata’s deft control of the image draws the viewer into moments of both wonder and confusion.

Takeshi Murata was born in 1974 in Chicago, IL. He graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1997 with a B.F.A. in Film/Video/Animation. He has had previous solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC , gallery.sora, Tokyo and The Reliance (The Approach), London. His work has been included in exhibitions at the New Museum, New York, Museum of Modern Art, New York, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin, Italy, Sikemma Jenkins & Co., New York, and Gladstone Gallery, New York. Murata currently lives and works in Saugerties, New York. This is his third solo exhibition with Ratio 3.

GALLERY HOURS: WEDNESDAY – SATURDAY; 11am – 6pm, and by appointment.

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

An Infinite Voyage and Everything in Between: A Traveling Art Project from Miami to Los Angeles Part III

Posted from The Citrus Report

foggy freeway in texas

We left New Orleans, drove straight through Houston and, eight and a half hours later, landed in Austin at the crack of dawn. I’ve been to Austin two years ago, coming here for the first time to attend the music festival SXSW. Arriving with the Infinite Wanderlust gang this time on a whim has allowed me to enjoy it at a much more laid back pace.

We drove through the entire town, exploring the different neighborhoods and on our last drops of gas, made it out to a small town in the hills surrounding Austin to Saltlick. This restaurant immediately felt cozy and welcoming. The place was packed with large parties of large people sitting on wide seated rustic picnic tables all sharing numerous plates piled high with meat and bones. The pit where they cook the meat is also in view of everyone passing by and we were drooling as we were guided to our seats by our hostess. Our breakfast was a giant plate of barbecued ribs, sausage, brisket, coleslaw, beans, mashed potatoes, jalapenos, pickles, onions, bread, and pecan pie with ice cream. Everybody should go here if they get the chance. A lumberjack would be satisfied.

our breakfast in austin

Afterwards, we parked along the shores of the Colorado River near Austin Lake. A quick walk along the pathway led us to a dock with canoe paddling for rent by the hour. Even in the middle of December, the weather was perfect;  Austin offered us the best days of perfectly clear skies and a warm day on the entire trip so far. The sunshine was bright and a cool breeze was blowing through the fresh air. Sherry wanted to take a walk around the lake since we had been in the car for the last couple days, even sleeping in it too, sharing shifts of driving. There were lots of people strolling around, running, biking and walking their dogs. Jason brought his typewriter and was writing stories on a picnic bench. Saelee was laying down on the dock and was reading a book she got at the Austin Salvation Army. I rented a canoe and went around the lake for a while. Being out in the middle of the cool, dark emerald water was relaxing until I had to pee and the sound of the oars lapping the water wasn’t helping. So that cut my ride short, but it was meant to be because as I brought the canoe back onto the dock, I saw Jason and Saelee and some other people surrounded around a black swan.

magical black swan

Black swans most commonly reside where I come from in Australia and they’re a rarity here. I had chat with the man who fed the swans regularly and was their unofficial caretaker. He said that black swans are endangered and he’s not sure how this one got here. He thinks some rich person paid lot of money for it and it escaped. Our new feathered pal was especially friendly to everyone that day. We were petting him and he was comfortable enough to poop three giant green turds the size of breakfast sausage links. After the lake we needed to find some wifi to work and went to the Whole Foods flagship store which is the biggest most enormous Whole Foods I’ve ever been to. Almost as big as the swan’s turds.

-Arnold Coludy

Posted By The Citrus Report

An Infinite Voyage and Everything in Between: A Traveling Art Project from Miami to Los Angeles Part III

Posted from The Citrus Report

foggy freeway in texas

We left New Orleans, drove straight through Houston and, eight and a half hours later, landed in Austin at the crack of dawn. I’ve been to Austin two years ago, coming here for the first time to attend the music festival SXSW. Arriving with the Infinite Wanderlust gang this time on a whim has allowed me to enjoy it at a much more laid back pace.

We drove through the entire town, exploring the different neighborhoods and on our last drops of gas, made it out to a small town in the hills surrounding Austin to Saltlick. This restaurant immediately felt cozy and welcoming. The place was packed with large parties of large people sitting on wide seated rustic picnic tables all sharing numerous plates piled high with meat and bones. The pit where they cook the meat is also in view of everyone passing by and we were drooling as we were guided to our seats by our hostess. Our breakfast was a giant plate of barbecued ribs, sausage, brisket, coleslaw, beans, mashed potatoes, jalapenos, pickles, onions, bread, and pecan pie with ice cream. Everybody should go here if they get the chance. A lumberjack would be satisfied.

our breakfast in austin

Afterwards, we parked along the shores of the Colorado River near Austin Lake. A quick walk along the pathway led us to a dock with canoe paddling for rent by the hour. Even in the middle of December, the weather was perfect;  Austin offered us the best days of perfectly clear skies and a warm day on the entire trip so far. The sunshine was bright and a cool breeze was blowing through the fresh air. Sherry wanted to take a walk around the lake since we had been in the car for the last couple days, even sleeping in it too, sharing shifts of driving. There were lots of people strolling around, running, biking and walking their dogs. Jason brought his typewriter and was writing stories on a picnic bench. Saelee was laying down on the dock and was reading a book she got at the Austin Salvation Army. I rented a canoe and went around the lake for a while. Being out in the middle of the cool, dark emerald water was relaxing until I had to pee and the sound of the oars lapping the water wasn’t helping. So that cut my ride short, but it was meant to be because as I brought the canoe back onto the dock, I saw Jason and Saelee and some other people surrounded around a black swan.

magical black swan

Black swans most commonly reside where I come from in Australia and they’re a rarity here. I had chat with the man who fed the swans regularly and was their unofficial caretaker. He said that black swans are endangered and he’s not sure how this one got here. He thinks some rich person paid lot of money for it and it escaped. Our new feathered pal was especially friendly to everyone that day. We were petting him and he was comfortable enough to poop three giant green turds the size of breakfast sausage links. After the lake we needed to find some wifi to work and went to the Whole Foods flagship store which is the biggest most enormous Whole Foods I’ve ever been to. Almost as big as the swan’s turds.

-Arnold Coludy

Posted By The Citrus Report

Journey to the End of the World: Continued Adventures with the Infinite Wanderlust Crew

Posted from The Citrus Report

I have been to the end of the world and back.

Not to be mistaken for Venice Beach, CA, Venice, Louisiana is the last community down the Mississippi River that is accessible by auto. For this reason, it has been nicknamed “the end of the world.” Driving through Lousiana’s backroads, the scene is speckled with enclaves of petro strongholds, with familiar names including BP, Chevron, and Halliburton. The road itself is nondescript; aside from giant American trucks crawling alongside us and rows upon rows of mobile homes, the landscape was lush with foliage but otherwise uneventful.

The two-hour drive was finally rewarded by an almost untouched estuary complete with wildlife and birds. One can only imagine what it may have looked like after the oil spill, but as far as I can tell it was nature reminding me of her splendor and beauty. A quiet fishing town, the very end of the road led to a dock where fishermen gathered for their daily bids.

After a brief moment with the landscape, the Infinite Wanderlust team and I made our way back towards New Orleans, where, after a brief dinner of a crawdaddy boil and other creole delectables, we journeyed into the night with Houston as our destination. Jason and Saelee came up with a new game, whereby Sherry would need to guess what city she is in upon waking up in the car. Not that hard of a game when you’re traveling through Texas, where there are a handful of cities one may end up in. But if you’re on a road trip where the end of the world is in your itinerary, the game may prove a tad more difficult.

– Arnold Coludy

End of the World, Mississippi Delta

Directory of Businesses

Mississippi Delta

Train tracks, Colorado River in Austin, TX

In Memory Of

Posted By The Citrus Report