Cai Guo-Qiang “Mystery Circle” for MOCA

æOver 40,000 rockets blasting off from the wall of the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. On Saturday April 7, artist Cai Guo-Qiang marked the opening of his exhibition with Mystery Circle: Explosion Event for The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; a site-specific work created for MOCA.”

CAI GUO-QIANG: SKY LADDER
On view April 8, 2012–JULY 30, 2012
The Gefffen Contemporary at MOCA

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Ed Ruscha x Dennis Hopper Exhibition Poster, Ferus Gallery, 1964

ef1f120e15hopper.jpg Ed Ruscha x Dennis Hopper Exhibition Poster, Ferus Gallery, 1964 vintage nada intersection hopper exhibition ed ruscha dennis hopper alden projects

Featured at the Alden Projects booth at the NADA Fair New York this past weekend was this gem; a 1964 exhibition poster of Ed Ruscha’s exhibition at Ferus Gallery, featuring an iconic photograph by Dennis Hopper. Probably our favorite thing we saw all weekend…

From Alden:

This is the vintage exhibition poster commemorating Ed Ruscha’s second one-person exhibition that opened at Ferus on October 20th, 1964 and where Ruscha originally exhibited his paintings of gasoline stations for the first time. This printing constitutes the original reception context for his friend, Dennis Hopper’s now infamous 1961 photograph taken through a windshield at the intersection of Santa Monica and Melrose: it captures a pit stop to which Ruscha would return again: a Standard Station and its doubled signs. A billboard over the gasoline station reads: “Smart Women Cook with Gas in Balanced Power Homes,” slyly eliding Ruscha’s own interest in signs, wordplay, gasoline stations, and small fires evident in his then-recent works. The photographic image is juxtaposed not with the quotidian details of the exhibition’s place and time, but simply with the loud signal of an early Op-like typeface, honking the artist’s name in green ink: “RUSCHA”.

Although Dennis Hopper’s photographs were incorporated into several Ferus Gallery exhibition poster contexts, this one—whose vantage and subject dovetails so closely with the young Ruscha’s own aims—was both a familiar and uncanny choice. “The Double Standard photograph of mine,” Hopper recalled, “which I took in 1961 was Ed’s announcement for his 1964 show (at Ferus) of paintings of Standard gas stations, one of which I bought, I think, for $780.” That the double boomerang of Hopper and Ruscha’s photographic readymades depicting urban scrawl — gasoline stations, billboards/signs, wordplay, font-play, and more — finds cross-pollination in this particular and original ephemeral context is a combustible elixir of Los Angeles car, cool, fame, and flame. This perplexing publication is the authentic 1964 issue, printed in its vintage strike. Very good condition. With no pinholes or time staining. Not to be confused with the different printed context of Ace Gallery’s re-issue of Hopper’s negatives as over-sized, boutique art photographs in 2006.

Tauba Auerbach’s “Float” @ Paula Cooper Gallery, NYC

24ee28e48505x453.jpg Tauba Auerbach’s “Float” @ Paula Cooper Gallery, NYC viewer united the arts tauba auerbachs tauba auerbach tauba subtly shifting paula cooper material volume headlines exhibition citrus report auerbach art

This is how Tauba Auerbach and Paula Cooper Gallery of NYC announced her newest exhibition that opened this past weekend. We like a good bit of pretension in the arts, especially with invites and announcements. We weren’t invited. But we still like the art.

In her acclaimed series of Fold paintings, first introduced in 2009, Auerbach presents powdery trompe l’oeil surfaces that register the traces of their former three-dimensionality. Painted with an industrial sprayer, the works draw attention to the physical properties of pigment imitating light. Alongside new Fold paintings, this exhibition will include a new series of Weave paintings, presented for the first time in the United States. As with folding, Auerbach uses weaving to reassess and thoroughly transform the flat picture plane. Elusive topographies emerge from the monochromatic works, bringing the viewer into a subtly shifting world of ruptures and continuities, reliefs and recesses.

In addition to the paintings, the exhibition will present new photographs and sculptural objects, including Onyx, a deconstructed material volume printed and bound in book form. As Auerbach once observed, “A book is an X-axis. The format is almost always linear; the content, bound in a prescribed order, marches single file.”* Inspired by a desire to upend this theory, Auerbach resorts to tomography (the method of producing images of the internal structure of an object), allowing the viewer to slice through a solid block of onyx layer by layer, revealing the twists and turns of a mineral narrative.

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First Friday: 2Pac (Makaveli) “Hail Mary”

If we are going to celebrate the work of Michael Miller and his exhibition at FIFTY24SF Gallery, “West Coast Hip-Hop: A History in Pictures,” then we are going to celebrate 2Pac’s last studio album, Makaveli and the The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory and “Hail Mary.” Hard to imagine this man was only 26. Legend. Of. The. Game.

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Ryan McGinness @ Pace Primitive, NYC

93fe0fc020itives.jpg Ryan McGinness @ Pace Primitive, NYC works on paper volumetric form vector graphics The Citrus Report solid geometry Ryan McGinness pace primitive nyc modernist modern headlines flash exhibition citrus report

Something to do on March 30, 2012. If you live in the NYC area, that is. If you don’t know what it means to have a show at Pace Primitive and have the name Ryan McGinness, this is what its about: “In constructive solid geometry, primitives are simple geometric shapes such as the cube, cylinder, sphere, cone, pyramid, and torus. The schematic reduction of the human figure historically found in African art profoundly influenced Modern art. Rather than a naturalistic approach to sculpture, African art has emphasized simplified volumetric form and line. “Geometric Primitives” is also a term used in computer graphics to refer to the smallest and irreducible geometric elements that the system can handle. In vector graphics, geometric primitives are lines, circles, curves, and polygons. In this exhibition, Ryan McGinness takes the geometric primitives of African art objects and creates two-dimensional geometric primitives which are then used to create this new body of work. The results are a series of paintings, works on paper, cyanotypes, and prints which take the modernist approach into the 21st Century.”

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Quayola & Memo “Forms”

Forms (Excerpt) from Nexus Productions on Vimeo.

“Quayola (aka ‘dQ’) and Memo Akten through digital production outfit Nexus Interactive Arts, have created ‘Forms’, a multiscreen digital artwork commissioned by the National Media Museum for the exhibition In the Blink of an Eye: Media and Movement, which is part of the Cultural Olympiad programme. This generative animation and interactive installation will display at the Museum from 9 March – 2 September.”

Saner: Corazón Sangrante (Bleeding Heart) Opening March 16th

dc290cbc2748 PM.png Saner: Corazón Sangrante (Bleeding Heart) Opening March 16th viewer sister signature saner reflection opening march mexico FIFTY24SF exhibition david siqueiros clemente orozco

FIFTY24SF Gallery, in association with Upper Playground, is pleased to announce Corazón Sangrante (Bleeding Heart), an exhibition featuring new works from Mexico City-based fine artist, Saner. After showing at our sister gallery, FIFTY24MX in Mexico City, this will be Saner’s first exhibition in our San Francisco space. The exhibition opens March 16, 2011.

Saner is a leading member of contemporary muralists and fine artists working in both Latin America and Europe. His mural work has been inspired by the Mexican Muralist Movement and David Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco, and Diego Rivera. For this exhibition, Saner will be presenting new paintings and drawings on paper, featuring his signature animal and human hybrid characters. His fine artwork is inspired and informed by research into Mexican custom and folklore, mysticism, masks, and skulls. The character’s most basic rituals are laid bare in each painting, allowing the viewer to see inside Saner’s personal symbology. As written by FIFTY24MX curator Liliana Carpinteyro, Saner’s “free and unpretentious spirit allows him to express a new Mexican vision.”

Saner (Edgar Flores) titled this exhibition “Corazón Sangrante” (Bleeding Heart), while reflecting on the things he saw around him: violence, anger, happiness, anxiety, and fear. Saner says these are the issues that most Mexicans deal with as part of a daily ration of “food”: junk food that is “consuming the body of a society that is getting closer to it’s destruction, unless the blood warriors awake,” he says.

Using the contrasts of lights-shadows and light-darkness, Saner reflects the eternal battle of men, his images referring to that absurd struggle of daily survival, exposing chaos as the background for resurrection. Those who see their reflection in these images will be reunited with the impossible dream, a utopia of mirrors that nobody wants to recognize and to which all escaped. Why change if the tide has not affected us yet?

Posted by FIFTY24SF Gallery

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Kota Ezawa “The Curse of Dimensionality” @ Haines Gallery, SF

53929fee8505x340.jpg Kota Ezawa “The Curse of Dimensionality” @ Haines Gallery, SF work resizer really create nice magic love the work kota ezawa haines gallery haines Gallery exhibition dimensionality citrus

This exhibition opened last night in San Francisco, California, and we wanted to go, but we didn’t, but we will, because we love the work of Kota Ezawa. Lightboxes, beautifully rendered, really create a nice magic in the gallery.

http://www.hainesgallery.com/

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Jeremy Fish iPad 2 Giveaway

1275756a5905x379.png Jeremy Fish iPad 2 Giveaway upper playground upper playgrond playground learn lance mountain Jeremy Fish ipad interactive headlines flash exhibition contest citrus report audio

Jeremy Fish and Upper Playground have teamed up to create a new app to bring Fish’s groundbreaking “Listen and Learn” exhibition to your iPad and iPhone. In conjunction with the app’s launch, Jeremy Fish has illustrated (and we mean hand drew, with his actual hands) the back of a brand new iPad 2 being given away on Upper Playgrond’s Facebook page.

This past summer at Joshua Liner Gallery in NYC, Jeremy Fish created an interactive exhibition featuring 30 paintings based on stories told my some of Fish’s closest friends and inspirational talents. Each painting was accompanied with headphones to allow visitors to listen to the audio recordings while viewing Jeremy’s visual interpretation of the story on the wall. Fish gathered Snoop Dogg, Aesop Rock, Mike Giant, Lance Mountain, El-P, Ron English, Ricky Powell, and many others to get some of their most inspiring stories on record.

As not all of Fish’s closest fans made it out to the exhibition, we have collaborated on the “Listen and Learn” app, bringing the interactive experience to your iPad and iPhone and bring new life to Fish’s “story paintings” and most experimental gallery show to date. The app comes bundled with 30 images of Fish’s paintings and 1.5 hours of audio stories that accompanied and inspired each piece. The “Listen and Learn” app also comes with a handful of videos and gallery of images from Fish’s exhibition.

To kick off the launch of the “Listen and Learn” app, Fish has illustrated (in black Sharpie) on the back of a brand new iPad 2, being given away now on Upper Playground’s Facebook page. To enter the contest, simply include your email address in the contest link on the lower left side of the Upper Playground Facebook page. One winner at random will get a Fish customized iPad 2. The contest runs through December 31, 2011.

For those of you on a Mobile Device, use this link.

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