11 Sci-fi predictions that came true, including the cubicle

Posted from The Citrus Report

6a8359ad63bicles.jpg 11 Sci fi predictions that came true, including the cubicle white virtual reality virtual reality games video chat the machine stops the escalator since the music receiver ipad headlines face as white escalator citrus report

Holla! E.M. Forster predicted the cubicle in 1909’s The Machine Stops. Mashable has done a great job creating 11 predictions in the sci-fi world that have come true. Like the iPad, tanks, A-bomb, video chat, automatic doors, earbud headphones, virtual reality games, cubicles, the escalator, submarines, and radar.

Here is the great Forster passage:

Imagine, if you can, a small room, hexagonal in shape, like the cell of a bee. It is lighted neither by window nor by lamp, yet it is filled with a soft radiance. There are no apertures for ventilation, yet the air is fresh. There are no musical instruments, and yet, at the moment that my meditation opens, this room is throbbing with melodious sounds. An armchair is in the centre, by its side a reading-desk — that is all the furniture. And in the armchair there sits a swaddled lump of flesh — a woman, about five feet high, with a face as white as a fungus. It is to her that the little room belongs.

An electric bell rang.

The woman touched a switch and the music was silent.

“I suppose I must see who it is”, she thought, and set her chair in motion. The chair, like the music, was worked by machinery and it rolled her to the other side of the room where the bell still rang importunately.

“Who is it?” she called. Her voice was irritable, for she had been interrupted often since the music began. She knew several thousand people, in certain directions human intercourse had advanced enormously.

But when she listened into the receiver, her white face wrinkled into smiles, and she said:

“Very well. Let us talk, I will isolate myself. I do not expect anything important will happen for the next five minutes — for I can give you fully five minutes, Kuno. Then I must deliver my lecture on ‘Music during the Australian Period.’”

Posted By The Citrus Report