HYPERREALIST ENVIRONMENTS BY JOSHUA COCKING

by Ariadna Zierold

joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground

Broome, Australia based artist Joshua Cocking is quickly becoming known for his surreal compositions and hyperrealist style. Within his compositions, Cocking addresses the relationship humans have with their immediate environment, how one can affect the other and that they are inextricably linked.

joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground

After 15 years painting, Joshua has found his visual voice and in the last 4 years and has received acclaim in several prestigious Australian Art Prizes.  In 2014 he was the winner of the 2014 Cossack Acquisitive Art Award  and was awarded a highly commended in the 2015 Paddington Art Prize and 2015 Black Swan Portrait Prize.

joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground joshua cocking, surreal, hyperreal, landscape, composition, environment, portrait, people, balloons, australia, broome, upper playground

Porcelain Prodigy | KATE MACDOWELL

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy’s Dismaland group exhibition.

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (1)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (2)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (3)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (4)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (5)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (6)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (7)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (8)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (9)

Sculptor, Kate MacDowell, creates beautiful porcelain sculptures depicting the union between man and nature. Her work shows the relationship to be one of friction and discomfort, exacerbating human and animal vulnerability by the destructive impact technological advancements have created on the environment. MacDowell highlights stressors such as climate change, pollution and genetically modified agriculture. Just last year, MacDowell was a featured artist in Banksy's Dismaland group exhibition. Via news.upperplayground.com (10)

SEA WALLS: MURALS for OCEANS at Isla Mujeres, Mexico

This year, PangeaSeed in collaboration with 1xRUN, Residencia Gorila, World Art Destinations and Juxtapoz Latin America organized “Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans” – Mexico Expedition. The week-long mural festival took place in July 20-28 on the island of Isla Mujeres, Mexico.

pangeea

With a  goal to creatively raise awareness for the conservation of the ocean and the need to protect whale sharks and manta rays off the Yucatan peninsula, internationally acclaimed contemporary artists  were invited from every where.  Curiot, Saner, Nosego, Shark Toof, Tristan Eaton, Celeste Byers, Meggs, Cinzah Merkens, Tatiana Suárez, Hannah Stouffer, Smithe, Aaron Glasson, Yoh Nagao, Vexta and Pelucas attended the festival.

Each artist was given the opportunity to swim with and study whale sharks and oceanic manta rays and experience these endangered animals in their natural environment.  Manta Ray 1 Whale Shark 1

And in turn, inspired by their personal animal encounters, the artists created a series of 14 large-scale ocean-themed murals on Isla Mujeres to help educate and raise greatly needed awareness within the local and tourist communities for the plight of these animals and oceans.

Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground  Celeste Byers 2 Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground    Pangeea, Upper Playground  Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground

Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground  Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground Pangeea, Upper Playground

About PangeaSeed

PangeaSeed (pangeaseed.org) is an international organization who collaborates with

 

members of the art, science, and environmental activist communities. PangeaSeed is dedicated

to raising public awareness and education surrounding the conservation and preservation of

sharks and other marine species in peril.

Through volunteer activism, research and the various mediums of art, music, film and

photography, PangeaSeed aims to create a sea change within the global community and

develop an understanding of the need to preserve and protect the world’s oceans.

Luzinterruptus wants Radioactive Control

IMG 6504 605x403 Luzinterruptus wants Radioactive Control ms dockville Luzinterruptus

Wow, the Luz Crew just killed it. We now officially have a Top 5 of things we have loved this year: Evol at MS Dockville, Swoon at MOCA, Swampy at FIFTY24SF (hometown hero), McQueen at MET, and now Luzinterruptus at MS Dockville. Those are things we have seen this year where we go, you know what, that is pretty damn good. This one just completes it.

Here is the full rundown to what you are looking at… via Nuart.

The installation Radioactive Control was created for the Dockville Festival in de Hamburg which tried to demonstrate, in a humorous tone, the paranoia that we are suffering from since the escape of radioactive material in Japan, has brought into question the safety systems at the nuclear power plants.

With our mysterious army of 100 illuminated radioactive figures, which advanced threateningly on the natural environment of the festival, we wanted to invite reflection regarding the use and abuse of nuclear energy, cheap in economic terms, but which can cause grave secondary effects for the environment and health, forever irreversible.

Germany has been the first developed country to announce the total abandonment of nuclear energy by 2022, we know that this was not an altruistic decision and has a lot to do with the creation of new and innovative industries, which will make them pioneers in the market. But just in case they change their minds, we already know that what politicians legislate today, they change tomorrow with impunity, we wanted to simulate, for the festival, a life under the constant threat of nuclear accidents.

Thanks to the people of the Dockville organization for their help and support in putting together the installation and their hospitality during our stay and to all the volunteers who donated their time and abilities so that in the end our army stayed afoot, with a military air, for the month that the festival lasted.

The photos are by Gustavo Sanabria. In a few days we will add more information with video and more photos of the installation.

Time of installation: 6 days.
Damages: none.
Exhibition time: 30 days.

IMG 6476 215x165 Luzinterruptus wants Radioactive Control ms dockville Luzinterruptus
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IMG 6504 215x165 Luzinterruptus wants Radioactive Control ms dockville Luzinterruptus
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From The Citrus Report

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Mercury Pollutant Making Birds Gay.

Posted from The Citrus Report

As a result, the male white Ibis are not continuing to reproduce. Suddenly supporting environmental conservation feels like we are on the Right Wing side of politics for family values. We love our big gay birds.

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Our trip to the Los Angeles Car Show . . .

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We went to the Los Angeles Auto Show recently, and we really were into a lot of the cars we saw. And we would also like to thank the automotive car industry for creating worthless product for years that has harmed the environment, destroyed a once proud American state, destroyed a region of the world because of the oil demand, and basically turned Americans into psychopathic oil drinking loonies. But hey, who doesn’t want an Audi that gets 15MPG, right?

So, if people think car companies really give a fuck about the environment, if they really care about innovation, you are sadly mistaken. They are about 2o years too late for the cause . . .

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Tara McPherson

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Tara McPherson is no stranger to the current climate of rock poster art and vinyl toys. We caught up with her at New York Comic Con this past weekend after a recent phone interview from her Brooklyn studio. At NYCC, she took part in The Cultyard, a grouping of like-minded creative companies who thought their appeal would be broadened by conglomerating at these larger scale art and culture events. The line to meet and greet Tara was long and constant, so we’re glad we got to do this interview before she arrived.  We spoke after weeks of missing each other, something that has probably become commonplace for Tara, as her work and popularity extend farther into the future, with shows, books and toy deals lining up in quick succession.

We were a media partner for the event, so we snapped some photos of Tara’s booth, saw her graciously sign prints, and watched as fans patiently awaited a chance to scoop something and say hello. Her aesthetic is distinct and approachable, albeit from very divergent points of view. Her choice of color palette is very soft and welcoming, yet her imagery and symbolism indicates a substantial amount of humanity in her work; heartache, longing, the nature of the mind, and the process of evolving as an individual. Her heart-less characters have become a hallmark of sorts, and her work rate is incredible.  Ahead, find out what this lifelong student has to say about creating beer labels for Dogfish Head, the thesis that is a solo show, and her artistic study of the water molecule.  —Evan La Ruffa

Photos by Matt Schuchman

Evan La Ruffa: Alright, ready to go…

Tara: Wonderful…

ELR: So, in looking over your creds, I saw Dogfish Head Brewery on your list of clients. They make some damn fine beer…what did you do for those guys?

I did two labels for them. One for a rasberry beer and another one for a seasonal beer.  I got a a lot of emails from people saying they loved the beer and loved the labels, it was fun to do…

ELR: Were you able to try those beers?

Yea, part of the deal in my contract for doing the labels was that they had me down to their brew house and restaurant. A friend and I drove down, and they gave us a tour of the brewery…we stayed at the Dogfish Suite at this hotel. The people at Dogfish head are cool. Really nice guys.

ELR: I usually talk to artists, at least a little bit, about art school. In some cases people diminish it, in others, people feel lucky to have done that kinda thing. How do you feel about it?

I guess it just depends on your personality. I loved art school. I’ve always loved school in general, even when I was a kid. I just like the environment, it just suits me really well. I would go to school forever if I could…except for spending the thousands of dollars for the degree (laughs…)

ELR: (Laughs…) Right, totally…

But, I treat life that way. The way that I work now is, ya know, prepping for a solo show is almost like working on a thesis. You do your research, and you put yourself through this process to get this body of work together.

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Alaska Week: Nature’s Last Stand

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Global Climate Change. Global Warming. “We are destroying our environment.” We hear this all the time. Regardless of what you believe, something is going on on the Planet Earth. Over 6 billion people doesn’t help. The overuse and abuse of fossil fuels in the greater part of the 20th Century, but we haven’t even begun the 21st Century yet, where over 2 billion people in the hyper-developing countries of India and China don’t seem to be all that concerned with proper “environmental practice.” And why should they? The United States has never been one to set the best of examples, and our own dependencies and use of oil and creation of waste has set the planet on a crash course with destruction.

The US owns a piece of land in the extreme northern hemisphere called Alaska which borders the North Pole, is rich and richer in oil, and to this day, still resides as a postcard of the last unscathed portion of Planet Earth. Bought from the Russian Empire on March 30, 1867 for a cool $7.2 million, Alaska was made a state (and the largest state at that) on January 3, 1959. Only 698,473 people live there, nearly half in the Anchorage area. And it is the home of a vast amount of energy resources. Oil. Lots of it. It is only a matter of time that the virgin wilderness (well, some areas are already drilled like a Persian desert), is drilled by the likes of Shell, BP, or Chevron to a bloody drought. It is going to happen. It is happening, and one of the last natural beauties, a relic of what the world should and used to look like in the Northern Pole, will soon lose its unspoiled landscape. Glaciers are melting, drills are plunging, animals are becoming extinct. Its too late, and some are trying to treasure what they can before the destruction hits full steam.

Of course, some would say we are being dramatic. We are not experts, but there does seem to be a wave of real experts who are predicting a very warm century, a very greedy century, and perhaps a violent, destructive century. Hopefully, we are all wrong.

We received these pictures from someone who was in Alaska last week, so you are looking at the current state of the Alaskan wilderness, or at least the wilderness that the tour guides will take you. This is the way we want it to look. Natural. Untouched. Not ruined. Enjoy.

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BP Buys “Oil Spill” Search Terms on Google, Yahoo, and Bing to capture the message

BP Buys “Oil Spill” Search Terms on Google, Yahoo, and Bing to capture the message” posted from: The Citrus Report | Art, Culture, News, Graffiti, Music, Street Art, Clothing, Politics, Reviews

According to TreeHugger.com, “BP seems to have bought many phrases related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill on the major search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing). What this means is that people who do an internet search to find information about the spill have a good chance to see BP’s official site pop up at the top of their search results.” That just messes with the truth a tad, don’t you think?

Of course BP says, “We have bought search terms on search engines like Google to make it easier for people to find out more about our efforts in the Gulf and make it easier for people to find key links to information on filing claims, reporting oil on the beach and signing up to volunteer,” BP spokesman Toby Odone told ABC News.

They might as well say, we bought search terms so you fucking idiots out there can see we are making a minimal effort as we destroy the earth and we really don’t give a fuck because most of us executives live elsewhere and don’t give a shit about the Gulf of Mexico and the environment. Oh, and if you morons volunteer, that is less work for us. So thank you.

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