BOTANICAL DINOSAURS BY CHRIS RODLEY

by Ariadna Zierold

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Artist Chris Rodley used a deep learning algorithm to merge a book of dinosaurs with a book of flower paintings. The images were generated with an online service called DeepArt that lets you upload a “target” image and then apply a visual style to it. For step one he fed the network images of common dinosaurs and then applied the styles of 19th-century fruit engravings and botanical illustrations.

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CERAMIC INFLATABLE TOYS BY BRETT KERN

by Ariadna Zierold

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West Virginia-based artist Brett Kern sculpts these incredible “inflatable” dinosaurs and other objects out of plaster. Kern sculpts his own molds out of clay and uses glaze to emphasize his materials’ depth and details.

brett kern, inflatable, ceramic, dinosaur, toy, sculpture, upper playground

Pop culture has always influenced Kern’s work, and these faux inflatable sculptures are no exception. One of Kern’s first memories as a child was being given an inflatable dinosaur at the hospital for behaving while his mother gave birth to his sister. It’s this playful, childlike wonder that informs the bulk of his work, and the forging of a balance of fragility and buoyancy.

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ASTRONAUT DINOSAUR BY SCOTT LISTFIELD

by Ariadna Zierold

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Scott Listfield, born in Boston, MA, is known for his paintings featuring a lone exploratory astronaut lost in a landscape cluttered with pop culture icons, corporate logos, and tongue-in-cheek science fiction references. Scott studied art at Dartmouth College. After some time spent abroad, Scott returned to America where, a little bit before the year 2001, he began painting astronauts and, sometimes, dinosaurs.

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“Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey was released in 1968, well before I was born, so I have no firsthand knowledge of how it was received. I don’t know if people really believed we’d be living in space in 2001, if we’d have robot butlers and flying cars, geodesic lunar homes, and genetically reconstituted dinosaurs helping or eating us. But from Lost in Space to the Jetsons to Jurassic Park, it seems that popular culture has fostered this space-age perception of the future. Generations raised on these TV shows, movies, comic books, and novels are now grown and living in a future filled with mini vans, Starbucks, iPads, and Hip Hop videos. In many ways, the year 2001 failed to live up to expectations. And yet the world today is peculiar in ways unimagined in 1957, when Sputnik was launched, or in 1968, when 2001 was released, or even in 1994, at the dawn of the internet. The present is in fact a very unusual place, and it’s strangest in the ubiquity of things we take for granted.” Scott Listfield

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ARTISTS MAKE SCULPTURES OUT OF DISCARDED STRAW

by Ariadna Zierold

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n Japan’s Niigata Prefecture, artists have found a creative way to reuse the straw left over by the season’s bountiful harvest: they turn it into sculptures.

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Made at the annual ‘Wara Art Festival’, the sculptures are built using wooden frames and lots of straw. They often depict different subject matters, ranging from sharks to tanks to even wooly mammoths. This year, local artist Amy Goda created a highly-realistic Tyrannosaurus Rex and Triceratops, as well as other equally amazing works like a crab, a cobra, a praying mantis, and a rubber duck.

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The festival is held every 31 of August and has become a must-see event due to all the straw artworks on display.

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Massive T-REX mural by ROA in Sweden

Massive mural by ROA, who recently painted a large-scale factory building in Bromölla, Sweden.  An upside down skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus was the subject of the wall and our contributing photographer Henrik Haven covered its work in progress:
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The mural was made possible by the Ifö Center (who organized the mural) and their Artist-in-Residence program that ROA participated in.

Info about Ifo Center and their Artist-in-Residence program
Ifo Center is a new culture center still in its development stage. The initiative was taken in 2011 by artist couple Teresa Holmberg and Jonathan Haner. The goal is to open up the factory area for both culture and tourism. The project encompasses over 4,200 square meters of the unoccupied floors of the factory. Here we are creating collective work areas for professional artists, exhibition spaces, as well as areas for workshops. Simultaneously, we have already begun holding workshops, guided tours and have just completed our first Artist-in-Residence program with ROA being the first international artist to leave his mark on the factory walls. Ifo Center is located in the center of Bromolla, situated in north-east Scandia. The village is known for its large ceramic industry, prehistoric fossil-finds and for the world’s largest ceramic fountain (Gunnar Nylund’s ‘Scanisaurus’). Ifo Center is financed via an EU grant and is owned by Bromolla County.

Sometimes the biggest problem people have is what to do with a wooden dinosaur

Posted from The Citrus Report

That is the problem in Post Mills, Vermont, where a man’s trash-turned piece of art in the form of a dinosaur is apparently causing a lot of problems in the community. The piece is 25-foot-tall, 122-foot-long, quite impressive that one man, one Brian Boland created. (He has some volunteers, but it was his vision.)

How did he do it?

He cut a huge pine tree into four pieces and, using a back hoe, planted them as the bases of the four feet. Then, over nine days and using dozens of volunteers, the ersatz sculpture began taking shape.

A splintered 2-by-4 here, the rotted belly of a guitar there, half a ladder from a child’s bunk bed here, Boland and his volunteers worked under basic ground rules: No saws, no rulers and no materials other than what was in the scrap pile.

According to Yahoo,“The state Division of Fire Safety, meanwhile, told Boland that if he couldn’t get a structural engineer to attest to the sculpture’s safety, he could not allow people to congregate underneath it. Boland has since wound a strap around the legs to keep people from walking under the belly of the beast.”

Posted By The Citrus Report