SPIRALING PORTRAITS BY PATAKK

by Ariadna Zierold

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Zagreb-based Croatian digital artist Paolo Ceric aka Patakk creates incredibly realistic images with a single spiraling line. The long, winding mark manages to simulate the appearance of lifelike figures through the expertly administered boldness and thickness of the line in any given spot. By diluting and condensing the saturation of the sole circling contour, the artist is able to mimic light and shadow, allowing it to reflect a sense of depth and realism.

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Not only do these beautiful black and white renderings appear surprisingly realistic, the line spiraling out from the center of each piece stirs the notion that each image was discovered by zooming in on someone’s actual fingerprint.

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Sobering murals in Brazil in protest of World Cup 2014

Today marks the first game of the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil, where host country Brazil goes head to head with Croatia. The wild anticipation and celebratory mood of all the fans roaring in the stadium and television screens helps us forget for a minute about the context of where it all takes place. While crowds of tourists pour into Brazil, the local street artist of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro went to work determined to speak up for the forgotten and downtrodden in their cities. Over 10,000 people have been forced to leave their homes for stadium construction and thousands are still homeless as a result and these walls reminds us of the raw power of political messaging through art and how small gestures can incite deep struggles hidden from view:

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Above mural painted by Brazilian artist Paulo Ito last month. The artist was quoted in the Guardian: “It’s a good way to expose the country’s problems. If the government doesn’t want to expose these things it’s because they feel ashamed. If they feel ashamed by this they might take it more seriously – at least, that’s our intention.”