TRANSITORY CINEMATIC MOMENTS BY JIM GAYLORD

by Ariadna Zierold

jim gaylord, abstract, painting, stills, cinema, cinematic, movies, figuration, new york, brooklyn, upper playground

New York City based artist Jim Gaylord‘s abstract works are often based on imagery from contemporary film and television. Combining stills from transitory cinematic moments, he transposes them to extract new compositions, which are then used as the bases for paintings and gouache on paper collages. Gaylord’s work combines meticulous figuration with obscure forms that are familiar but unrecognizable.

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THE AMAZING WORK OF JOHN ALVIN

by Ariadna Zierold

john henry alvin, john alvin, poster, posters, movie, cinema, film, art, e.t., blade runner, gremlins, the goonies, beauty and the beast, aladdin, the lion king, star wars, upper playground

John Henry Alvin (November 24, 1948 – February 6, 2008) was one of the most celebrated contemporary American cinematic artists. He illustrated multitude of film posters for American cinema. He is credited for designing posters and key art for over 135 films, beginning with the poster for Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles (1974).. Alvin’s trademark style came to known as Alvinesque by his associates and friends.

john henry alvin, john alvin, poster, posters, movie, cinema, film, art, e.t., blade runner, gremlins, the goonies, beauty and the beast, aladdin, the lion king, star wars, upper playground

Sunday newspapers held attraction for young Alvin as it featured movie advertisements which led to his growing interest in movie poster creation. In 1971, he earned his graduate degree from Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles and soon after took up a job as a freelance artist.

john henry alvin, john alvin, poster, posters, movie, cinema, film, art, e.t., blade runner, gremlins, the goonies, beauty and the beast, aladdin, the lion king, star wars, upper playground

Alvin’s work included the movie posters for E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Blade Runner, Gremlins, The Goonies, The Color Purple, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin and The Lion King. He also created the anniversary posters for Star Wars.

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MODERN-DAY FOSSILS BY DORA BUDOR

by Ariadna Zierold

dora budor, sculpture, installation, cinema, film, props, movies, objectsreanimation, recontextualization, upper playground

New York-based Croatian artist Dora Budor creates sculptures and films that expose the technical and otherwise overlooked elements of movies. Budor most regularly engages with movie props—objects which are inherently fake or flawed, yet appear real and perfect on-screen—in order to “reanimate” them and give them a second life through recontextualization.

dora budor, sculpture, installation, cinema, film, props, movies, objectsreanimation, recontextualization, upper playground

A series of sculptures built around discarded movie props with artificial weathering, rust, and dust positions the objects as modern-day fossils. Budor views cinema through an anthropological lens, seeking to explore how people interact with films and the way that fictional characters become part of a collective emotional reality.

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Unreleased Photos from New Documentary “Blue Velvet Revisted” by Peter Braatz

Blue Velvet is celebrating its 30th birthday this year coinciding with Peter Braatz’s release of Blue Velvet Revisited – never before seen photos and footage depicting the making-of. Director, Filmmaker and Transcendental Meditator, David Lynch asked German-born Braatz to come out to North Carolina to “observe him direct.” Braatz shot 70 reels of Super 8 film and took nearly 1000 photos. The behind the scenes look encapsulates the world of Blue Velvet and David Lynch like a fly on the psychedelic wall of the 1985 set. Photos of Dennis Hopper, Isabella Rossellini, Laura Dern, Kyle MacLachlan and of course, Mr. Lynch himself. 

“David was producing every piece of art,” Braatz says. “He’s writing, he’s creating props, he’s making set decoration. You see him in my film working on each piece himself. So it’s not just a portrait of Blue Velvet, but a portrait of David in 1985 as an artist.”

“Beneath that appearance there are so many things happening,” says Lynch in Blue Velvet Revisited, and this making-of piece will take its viewers there. The documentary is being released along with a soundtrack just out from Crammed Discs.

“Sound is so important to him [Lynch], he adds so many things in postproduction,” Braatz says. “Ants crawling under a glass or—how do you call it in English?—a match that goes on fire. These things are mostly related very closely to the sound of the picture.” Angelo Badalamenti composed the original movie’s soundtrack and went on to create many more musical masterpieces with Lynch on projects such as Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, and Twin Peaks.

Now Braatz has made an homage to Blue Velvet, sensual, provocative and true to the eccentric, dreamy vibrations of what is now a voyeur classic. A “meditation,” he calls it.

Braatz hopes the documentary will have a film festival premiere this year.

Photos: Peter Braatz Blue Velvet Revisited 

David Lynch

Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini

David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini

Laura Dern and Kyle MacLachlan

Laura Dern and Kyle MacLachlan

Laura Dern and Kyle MacLachlan

 

Eazy E’s son wants to play dad in NWA movie

0927 lil eazy e ex2 Eazy Es son wants to play dad in NWA movie son nwa movie ice cube eazy e

That should make it easier. TMZ, the most reliable news source in all things unreliable, “reports” that they spoke with Eric Wright Jr. — aka Lil’ Eazy-E — who told them he’s “very excited” that “New Line Cinema is moving forward with the flick … which is set to be produced by Eazy’s former N.W.A. group member Ice Cube.” We would see the movie, probably interesting, as long as Ice Cube doesn’t act in it. Have you seen those commercials where he yells at the beer bottles?

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Francis Ford Coppola on Modern Filmmaking

Posted from The Citrus Report

We like Francis Ford Coppola’s rules for filmmaking: 1) Write and direct original screenplays, 2) make them with the most modern technology available, and 3) self-finance them. But it is not like FFC came up with this idea while sipping red wine in Napa. This is a career of evolving and progressing and making mistakes and then not making mistakes.

There is a great interview with Coppola on The99Percent, where he riffs a bit on his career, and the modern filmmaker.

A good exchange:

Why did you choose not to teach a master class?

For me in cinema there are few masters. I have met some masters – Kurosawa, Polanski – but I am a student.

I just finished a film a few days ago, and I came home and said I learned so much today. So if I can come home from working on a little film after doing it for 45 years and say, “I learned so much today,” that shows something about the cinema. Because the cinema is very young. It’s only 100 years old.

Even in the early days of the movies, they didn’t know how to make movies. They had an image and it moved and the audience loved it. You saw a train coming into the station, and just to see motion was beautiful.

The cinema language happened by experimentation – by people not knowing what to do. But unfortunately, after 15-20 years, it became a commercial industry. People made money in the cinema, and then they began to say to the pioneers, “Don’t experiment. We want to make money. We don’t want to take chances.”

An essential element of any art is risk. If you don’t take a risk then how are you going to make something really beautiful, that hasn’t been seen before? I always like to say that cinema without risk is like having no sex and expecting to have a baby. You have to take a risk.

You try to go to a producer today and say you want to make a film that hasn’t been made before; they will throw you out because they want the same film that works, that makes money. That tells me that although the cinema in the next 100 years is going to change a lot, it will slow down because they don’t want you to risk anymore. They don’t want you to take chances. So I feel like [I’m] part of the cinema as it was 100 years ago, when you didn’t know how to make it. You have to discover how to make it.

Read the rest here.

Posted By The Citrus Report

María Azul Staniscia

Thank you very much! I love the idea of the blog.
Sorry for my English, here are the answers:

Where do you live?
I live in Argentina.

What do you take pictures of?

I usually take pictures of my friends, they are beautiful beings.

What kind of camera do you use?

I use an old analog camera which belonged to my mother, a Yashica Electro 35. Their batteries are hard to find in local stores, so the photometer does not work.

What influences you?

I think that all I perceive influenced me, but the movies are a great source of inspiration, I love the cinema.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

In five years I see myself living in Italy, since I was little I had this dream because my grandfather was born there.

What makes you happy?

Life makes me happy.

María Azul Staniscia

Posted from Battle at 3 A.M.