COMPLEXITY OF HUMAN CONDITION BY HARRIET LEE MERRION

by Ariadna Zierold

harriet lee merrion, illustration, clean, lines, bristol, narrative, oriental features, upper playground

Harriet Lee-Merrion is a freelance illustrator living in Bristol, originally from Falmouth, Cornwall. Her recurring theme is the complexity of human condition, analyzed through a visual style which reveals an ideal balance between oriental features and English heritage.

harriet lee merrion, illustration, clean, lines, bristol, narrative, oriental features, upper playground

Narrations of love, joy and madness interweave in delicate line works, sometimes without even the need for any color. The clean lines lend well to intricate designs, and the complex ideas that make her work so interesting are engrossing.

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ABSTRACTED FACES BY CHINA MIKE

by Ariadna Zierold

mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground

Mike Carr, a.k.a China Mike of Bristol, England, emerged in the 1990s as a “brush for hire” in the music and retail industries, and has since gone on to exhibit in galleries around the globe.

mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground

“Process is as important as the end result. I don’t really feel a pressure to create realistically defined images these days. I want there to be a playfulness in my work, to not get bogged down in mechanical routines.”

mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground

Old notebooks reveal more than his line work – a versatile mark-maker, his abilities as a draughtsman have returned to the fore in recent years; the photorealistic paintings which had become a trade mark, have given way to more abstracted figurative work.

mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground mike carr, china mike, bristol, painting, figurative, abstract, colorful, vivid, upper playground

El Mac in Bristol

El Mac just continues to be one of the best; a beautiful mural for the “See No Evil” festival in Bristol, England, the home of Banksy. A nice timelapse below as well…

Richard Long

rl2010bw 605x408 Richard Long Sf Moma sculpture richard long Photography landscape england Bristol

We have long been distant admirers of the work of Richard Long, and his “Art made by walking in landscapes, photographs of sculptures made along the way” body of work. After seeing his work at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2006, in an exhibit called The Path Is the Place Is the Line, we became even bigger fans. Born in Bristol, England in 1945, and has shown internationally since 1968. His last major exhibition was at the Tate Britain in 2009. These particular landscape images range from the 1960s to 1980s, and are all shot in black and white.

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http://www.richardlong.org

From The Citrus Report

Posted By The Citrus Report

Banksy in Mexico, 1999

Posted from The Citrus Report

Nuart posted some great shots of Banksy’s work in Mexico in 1999. Capturing Banksy got the story first, and it should be noted that Banksy went to Chiapas in Mexico in 1999 with the Bristol based anarchist football club The Easton Cowboys to play football against the Zapatista Army of National Liberation. While he was out there he also painted some murals in support of the Zapatista’s and put up some of his trademark stencils.”

Wait, what the fuck? Is that story real?

Posted By The Citrus Report

Banksy @ HMV

Posted from The Citrus Report

We wrote awhile back about cleverness and the artist formerly known as discrete and undercover, Banksy. We actually broke our analysis of the larger than life street artist into two parts, one about Banksy and Public Space, and the other about Banksy and his celebrity followers. We enjoyed his North American tour promoting the film, Exit Through the Gift Shop, where the artist who normally creates one piece of street work that causes worldwide response plastered city after city with multiple pieces, including a very publicized amount of work in San Francisco. It was the Spring of Banksy, and it never really seemed to be too tired in our eyes.

This past week, Banksy promoted the release of the DVD of Exit Through the Gift Shop with three original pieces installed in HMV music stores in London and Bristol, England. Yes, that’s right, HMV. Music stores. Banksy and the English still believe in music stores, apparently. The new works are well guarded by a hired security team. The pieces have probably garnered more attention in a music store than if Liam Gallagher showed up to play a solo set of his new songs (okay, we exaggerate, but you get our point, it is super popular).

Again, Banksy is causing a huff amongst haters and lovers alike. Bombast, of course it is. Self-promotional, well, that is what Exit Through the Gift Shop was all about. Original, there is no one else in the art game that we can think of who would promote his or her own DVD release by creating original pieces to be placed in a music store equivalent to a mall store. To us, this is again a moment where Banksy going over the normal has paid off. He is bringing the art back to his original fans, perhaps not on the street, but at a unique street level in a music store. The work isn’t for the staid audience in a museum, but for the active who are participating in popular culture at a place that sells affordable art (sometimes bad art, but oh well). A record shop, how clever.

We don’t want anything from Banksy other than a continuing story to be written, to not hide away for years scheming away on his next big move (although we are sure that is the next chapter, a long delay of silence). What people need to remember is that this is all fun. The whole Banksy game is fun. The amount that the work goes for at auction is arbitrary, and none of us can afford it anyway so who really gives a damn? Just try and remember that in 20 years, Banksy will probably be a museum staple, and let us hope it happens on his own terms, the way he has treated the last year of his career. Take it seriously because he’s not. He is just performing his own art world joke of “The Aristocrats.”

Thanks to Arrested Motion for the images.

Posted By The Citrus Report

Looks like Banksy made it to Glastonbury, too

Posted from The Citrus Report

Hang Up Pictures is reporting that the worldwide phenom known as Banksy (pronounced “Bank-see”), put this piece up at Glastonbury without anyone knowing it was him. It was spotted on the perimeter fence, so maybe he didn’t have a ticket. Sure, it looks like a Banksy.

Posted By The Citrus Report

An Ambassador for Pluto: Exclusive Interview with Ian Francis

IanFrancis
Are you familiar with the work of Ian Francis (Juxtapoz #96 )? Well, you should be because his paintings are spectacular. Get to know the Bristol based artist in a fresh interview, where among other topics, he makes a push to reinstate Pluto as a planet.

 

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Posted By Juxtapoz Magazine

A Friendly Invasion with Mike Stilkey: Exclusive Interview

MikeS
There are times when you look at an artist’s work and think, ‘why didn’t I think of that?’ Mike Stilkey is an incredibly imaginative man who paints on stacks of books whose work is simply so beautiful and makes such sense that we can’t help but wonder this. Richard Scarry and Chippy Coates talk to the artist while at The Bristol Museum of Art.

 

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Posted By Juxtapoz Magazine