OMIE CREATION BY REX WARRIMOU

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

Rex Warrimou (Sabïo) is Jagorai (Law Man) of the Dahorurajé clan. He is the senior custodian of Ömie creation knowledge and ‘keeper’ of many important Dahorurajé clan stories. Rex’s father, the late Chief Warrimou, entrusted him with this prestigious role.

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

By the late-1940s, missionaries had encroached into Ömie territory and were endeavouring to stamp out customary Ömie cultural practices. Sadly, they had already forbidden important rituals such as initiation and funerary ceremonies. Consequently, Warrimou was a key figure in the preservation of Ömie cultural traditions and time-honoured visual arts production.

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

The volcano Huvaimo is a sacred and powerful place where Ömie Ancestor Spirits reside. It erupted in 1951 and Warrimou believed the Ancestor Spirits were warning his people that their culture was being lost. In order to appease these forebears, Warrimou actively encouraged women Ömie artists to continue painting barkcloth. Additionally, he urged them to transfer customary men’s tattoo designs onto barkcloth.

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

To this day, the survival of Ömie barkcloth art is largely credited to Warrimou (along with his sister Nogi). Warrimou instilled in his son Rex the importance of preserving and maintaining traditional cultural practices and he is now considered the ‘keeper’ of the profound knowledge taught to him by his father. Late in 2012, Rex began painting these sacred stories onto barkcloth using his unique (for Ömie) figurative style. He is currently the only male artist painting for Ömie Artists.

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

Rex Warrimou’s traditional lands encompass the southern and eastern sides of Huvaimo itself, and the surrounding mountain ranges. With his family, Rex tirelessly watches over and cares for his homelands. Rex maintains the vital balance between his ‘people’ (including past, present and future generations) and the sacred environment from which they were created and of which they are so intrinsically a part. Rex is married to artist Jean-Mary Warrimou (Hujama) and together they have seven children. His sister Lila Warrimou (Misaso), with whom he sometimes collaborates, is the Paramount Chief of Ömie women.

rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground rex warrimou, jagorai, dahoruraje clan, omie, barkcloth, painting, sacred, stories, upper playground

A NEW LIGHT BY ILMA SAVARI

ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground

Ilma Savari is the daughter of venerated elder and pre-eminent Ömie artist Sarah Ugibari. In recent years, Sarah (the oldest living Ömie, at approximately ninety-seven years of age), has begun the crucial task of imparting her store of ancient wisdom to daughter Ilma. Among other things, this has involved Sarah teaching Ilma to paint and sew a number of enduring Ömie and Managalasi barkcloth designs. Both mother and daughter began working with Ömie Artists Inc. in 2009. These days, Ilma spends much of her time preparing barkcloths and painting and sewing the many ancestral designs Sarah has handed-down to her.

ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground

At the dawn of time, Managalasi and Ömie Ancestors emerged from the underground cave Vavago as a single people. Over time, these first people migrated across the greater Huvaimo region and into Hydrographer’s Range above Managalasi Plateau. Subsequently this group split into separate tribes which both still celebrate ‘Mina and Suja’, a shared ancestral creation story about the first man and woman. They also have many customs and barkcloth designs in common. Ilma creates works originating from both tribes because her mother Sarah was born Managalasi but later married an Ömie man. It was she who brought knowledge of Managalasi culture into the Ömie realm.

ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground

Ilma’s painted Ömie designs depict traditional Sidorajé clan tattoo markings, while her painted Managalasi designs originate from Koruwo and Kiara villages high on Hydrographer’s Range. Her appliquéd mud-dyed barkcloth designs, in the form of Chiefs’ prestige barkcloths, are derived from both tribes. Along with abstract paintings and appliquéd mud-dyed barkcloth designs, Ilma also paints important stories relating to sacred sites of Gora and her surrounding homelands. She uses a unique (for Ömie) combination of figuration and symbolism to create these compelling images.

ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground ilma savari, omie, sarah ugibari, managalasi, barkcloth, painting, upper playground