JEREMY FISH IS CITY HALL’S VERY FIRST ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

by Ariadna Zierold

To commemorate City Hall’s 100th anniversary, the San Francisco Arts Commission has selected Jeremy Fish as City Hall’s first ever artist in residence.

jeremy fish, city hall, residency, the citrus report, upper playground

The internationally renowned local artist started his residency on July 8th, 2015, and is currently working to create 100 pieces of art celebrating San Francisco and City Hall. This large body of work entitled O Glorious City will be exhibited at City Hall from November 4, 2015 to February 12, 2016.

“As San Francisco City Hall celebrates its centenary birthday I want to document 100 things all San Franciscans should love about their city. I love City Hall and feel it is often overlooked as a local architectural treasure.”

jeremy fish, city hall, residency, the citrus report, upper playground

Fish is interested in how people interact with City Hall, and throughout his residency he will be observing the day-to-day activity in the building, meeting with City Hall historians, and attending public meetings.

JEREMY FISH: “O GLORIOUS CITY” AT CITY HALL – NOW OPEN!

JEREMY FISH "O GLORIOUS CITY" AT CITY HALL

FIFTY24SF in association with Upper Playground and the San Francisco Arts Commission are proud to present “O Glorious City.” Now open to the public on the Ground Floor of San Francisco’s City Hall, the exhibition features 100 newly commissioned works of art by Jeremy Fish. “O Glorious City” features both drawings and photographs about San Francisco, with many relating specifically to historic City Hall. As part of his process to create this exceptionally large body of work, Fish assumed the role of the first official Artist in Residence at City Hall with gusto. The show’s title, “O Glorious City”, comes from a text written by former Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor inscribed in the rotunda of City Hall: “San Francisco, O glorious city of our hearts that has been tried and not found wanting, go thou with like spirit to make the future thine.”

EXHIBITION DETAILS:
O Glorious City
A solo exhibition celebrating SF City Hall’s 100th birthday
Exhibition Dates: November 4, 2015 – March 25, 2016
Free and open to the public.

Click Here For The Price List/Preview

Purchase inquires are now being accepted, please contact gallery@fifty24sf.com or (415) 728-8344 for more information.

FIFTY24SF Gallery Presents “Pareidolia” a Solo-Exhibition by David Choong Lee

David Choong Lee, Fifty24SF Gallery, Pareidolia, Upper Playground, San Francisco

FIFTY24SF GALLERY in association with Upper Playground is proud to announce the opening of our upcoming exhibition “Pareidolia” a Solo-Exhibition by David Choong Lee 이충엽. Opening Saturday, October 24th at 7:00pm. David Choong Lee combines elements of graffiti, collage, graphic design, portraiture, and classical realism. He was born in Seoul, Korea in 1966 and moved to the US in 1993 to pursue traditional fine art at the Academy of Art, where he currently teaches.  For inquiries about the show please contactgallery@fifty24sf.com.

“NUESTRA GENTE”, NEWEST MURAL BY EL MAC IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA

by Ariadna Zierold

El Mac recently stopped by Phoenix in Arizona a few monthas ago where he created this large-scale mural entitled “Nuestra Gente” (Our People).

el mac, nuestra gente, phoenix, arizona, mural, the citrus report, upper playground

The background designs around the face were painted by Mando Rascón, and the outer images on the ends of the mural were painted by Pablo Luna.

Mando and Pablo were known in the 90s as pioneers of graffiti in Phoenix. Pablo began painting graffiti in the early 80s and became one of Phoenix’s most prolific painters, while Mando perfected a style of intricate lettering that was unique and influential.

el mac, nuestra gente, phoenix, arizona, mural, the citrus report, upper playground

The American artist painted the center-part which is featuring a beautiful portrait painted with his signature striation technique.

WILL BARRAS NEW SERIES

by Ariadna Zierold

will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground

Will Barras grew up in Birmingham and moved to Bristol to study graphic design. He became one of a new crop of young artists working in Bristol’s renowned street-art scene. He was a founding member of the Scrawl collective, alongside Steff Plaetz and Mr. Jago, thanks to his representations of fluid movement, unique narrative-driven composition, and line work. Scrawl published a seminal book in 1999 to document the new movement.

As such, Barras traveled extensively, live-painting and exhibiting pieces throughout Europe, the U.S., and Asia. Though Scrawl slowed down, he continued to paint and furthered his technique, collaborating with Stolen Space and the Brussels-based HLP. He currently takes on commercial projects of interest and directs animation at Th1ng studio in central London.

Check out his new series.

will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground will barras, painting, series, the citrus report, upper playground

 

EL MAC: A MODERN SPIN ON THE CONVENTIONALITY OF THE HUMAN PORTRAIT

by Ariadna Zierold

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

Miles “Mac” MacGregor is an artistic historian in his own right, capturing the influence of his culture within his works of art. The influence of El Mac’s Mexican and Chicano culture is written all throughout his creations.

He uses the streets as a way to continue the tradition of portraiture. Born in Los Angeles, the self-trained artist focuses on subjects that celebrate and reflect the cultural history of the southwest. Introduced to graffiti as a teenager, it was the materials and process involved in spray painting that captivated the artist more than writing letters.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

Collaboration is a part of graffiti and it’s a practice that Mac embraces, since the city is essentially a large shared space where his work lives. Set against the work of noted artists Nuke and Kofie, the layered mural honors indigenous peoples and invisible histories that are often forgotten.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

Mac like many artists learning their trade began by painting portraits of friends and family members but this output eventually progressed to conceptually heavier material. Choosing to paint a series of anonymous Mexican laborers, these paintings honored those that would not be typically featured in the history of portraiture.

His finished murals are so well regarded they are sometimes seen as unofficial monuments throughout the city. The artist knows these temporary contributions have a much more powerful impact during their life than traditional studio work. Collectively as a body, they celebrate, honor, and speak into human nature and the importance of truth and beauty.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

Mac utilizes an application of spray paint that appears to vibrate and ripple on the wall. Furthermore, precise shading gives life to his subjects, ultimately transmitting an palpable energy through his work that is unlike no other. While each portrait is typically soft from a distance, the crosshatching and line work bursts outward with exuberance.

The history of Mexican and Chicano culture is a constant in Mac’s work. A student of art history, his use of Catholic iconography is unmistakable. While he portrays everyday people, the juxtaposition of a mother and child, the use of blue cloak, or an implied halo around the head of one his sitters signifies the importance of the divine and the role of the church.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

“It’s a visual language that extends back to classical times.” Although not overtly religious himself, Mac sees himself as a spiritual person. He does not seek to teach biblical narratives or virtues but instead references this symbology and imparts its significance to his sitters, making the commonplace extraordinary.

After finishing his “Juarense y Poderosa” mural in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, El Mac moved up north to El Paso where he created another strong and meaningful piece. Titled “Ánimo Sin Fronteras” (Spirit Without Borders) it is another homage to the people that experienced the injustice and violence occurring regularly in the areas on the US/Mexican border. Through this series of murals, he is trying to get pay respect to these people and help them with their fights.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

“This is the mural I painted in El Paso, Texas, titled “Ánimo Sin Fronteras” (spirit without borders). All aerosol and fatcapsIt’s based on photos I shot in 2012 of a man named Melchor Flores, who’s been fighting to get answers and justice for his son who was picked up and disappeared by police in Nuevo León in 2009. This mural is located in the heart of downtown El Paso, and complements the fighting spirit of the classic boxing mural next to it. This is an important mural for me, something I’ve been trying to make happen for a while. It is for all those who fight for justice.”

Mac’s El Paso and Juárez murals are excellent examples of this energy applied to a political framework. The murals feature a different image on each side of the U.S./Mexican border and are a manifestation of Mac’s soft yet powerful voice. Each portrait addresses the violence and corruption with border politics and crime. The first portrait features a young woman whose mother was kidnapped and killed while the other is a man whose son was murdered by the police. The proud and dignified images exude hope and resilience yet simultaneously raise awareness to the awful conditions for those living on the border and the struggles these families have undergone. Mac’s ability to address difficult issues is shrouded in beauty and it makes the harsh truth palpable.

Miles MacGregor, el mac, mural, portrait, chicano, mexican, border, religious, spiritual, human, los angeles, the citrus report, upper playground

What makes El Mac’s works so memorable is his ability to put a modern spin on the conventionality of the human portrait by incorporating his detailed line work. This brings an almost distorted, fragmented accompaniment to his creations, opening the doors for varying interpretation. Challenged by creating difficult images, Mac succeeds by making more than a technically executed portrait. They instead are social and spiritual reminders of our humanity, the small details of what makes someone an individual become giant gestures to be admired.

 

 

GREG CRAOLA SIMKINS NEW ART POSTER FOR FOO FIGHTERS

by Ariadna Zierold

Check out the new poster Greg ‘Craola’ Simkins did for the Foo Fighters for their show on August 25 on foofighters.com.

greg craola simkins, poster, foo fighters, the citrus report, upper playground

He grew up with a menagerie of animals including a number of rabbits, which often emerge in his paintings. He began drawing at the early age of three and was inspired by various cartoons and books.

It is his careful weaving of pop culture, the old masters, nature, carnival kitsch, and his warped imagination, that makes Greg Simkins a sought-after surrealist painter today.